Help Us Give Back This Holiday Season with Les Dames d’Escoffier Ontario 2020 “Festive Gift Basket” Fundraiser-Auction

Les Dames d’Escoffier Ontario 2020 “Festive Gift Basket” Fundraiser-Auction  @ 32 Auctions

We have 23 “Holiday Gift Baskets” to be auctioned off !!

Auction dates:
December 3, 2020 at 09:00 AM EST to December 12, 2020 at 05:00 PM

Auction Link https://www.32auctions.com/LesDamesON

Items have been donated by members, partners, and Women in Wine Talks participants.

Donors

http://www.tenutasanguido.com/

www.antinori.it

www.chateau-lalagune.com

https://www.warwickwine.com/

https://www.cactusclubcafe.com/

https://www.frenchporium.com/

https://www.linkedin.com/company/womeninwinetalks/

https://www.liz-palmer.com/

Donna Lee-Rosen

Jenny Ratcliffe Wright

Heather Zordel

Shari Mogk Edwards

Doris Miculan Bradley

Anonymous

Les Dames d’Escoffier Ontario is a not-for-profit corporation and an affiliate chapter of Les Dames d’Escoffier International.

We are part of a philanthropic organization of women leaders in the multifaceted fields of gastronomy, fine beverage and hospitality. Our by-invitation membership is composed of over 2,400 members in 43 chapters including: United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, France and Mexico.  We create a supportive culture in our communities by sharing knowledge, supporting members, and providing leadership, educational opportunities and philanthropic events for the community-at-large.

 About Our Auction

All proceeds raised at our Les Dames d’Escoffier Ontario 2020 “Festive Gift Basket” Fundraiser-Auction will fund 2020/2021 educational scholarships, bursaries and assist in operations.

Thank you for your support – It’s time for Holiday shopping!

Auction Link https://www.32auctions.com/LesDamesON

#wine #winelover #fundraiser #womeninfood #fundraising #giftbaskets #Toronto #Torontoevent #onlineevent #auction #womenwhoauction #donate #nonprofit #community #giveback #philanthropy #instagood #socialgood #nonprofitorganization #luxurygiftbaskets #giftideas #holidaygift #christmasgift #onlineauction #corporategifts #givingtuesday #Torontolife

 

Women in Wine Talks with Kate Dingwall, Forbes: How Technology is Evolving and Disrupting the Wine World – Part 1


On November 26th we had the pleasure of listening to Kate Dingwall, Wine Writer, Sommelier speak on a trending topic “How Technology is Evolving and Disrupting the Wine World”.

This was another sold-out event for “Women in Wine Talks” bringing over one hundred global wine lovers, marketers, agents, sommeliers, journalists and other wine trade together.

Kate highlighted and did a deep dive into how the digital world is changing the industry, from investing to e-commerce, to virtual tastings, and speak to the downsides and upsides of technology infiltrating the wine world. Her highlights included:

  • Massive increase in online ordering
  • Change in distribution channels
  • Deployment of DTC

Kate Dingwall
Kate is a wine and spirits writer and a WSET-trained sommelier, a regular contributor at Forbes, and her work is frequently featured in various trade and lifestyle publications. Kate is also the former editor of FLARE Magazine.
Outside of writing, she completed her Masters of Brand Management with a focus on the “fine wine industry” and has acted as a marketing consultant for a number of spirits and hospitality brands in New York.

We will be posting the Webinar sometime next week.

Twelve Wine Consumer Trends in the Covid-19 Era

The Wine Intelligence report entitled “Wine Consumer Trends in the Covid-19 Era” was published last week and highlights a mini-boom for wine since the pandemic struck, yet it also warns of dark economic clouds on the horizon.

While key consumption markets have been turning more often to wine in the past six months, spurred by new ‘lockdown’ occasions and more drinking outside of mealtimes, there are concerns about the sustainability of this growth, given the deteriorating economic environment and possible pressure on household finances in the coming months, according to Wine Intelligence.

As part of the report, which collected data from wine drinkers in Australia, Canada, China, Germany, Sweden, the UK and the US, the research agency has identified 12 key consumer trends in the Covid-19 era, which we have reproduced below.

  1. Growth in wine consumption frequency with the shift to at-home occasions more than compensating for the loss of on-premise occasions.
  2. Heartland wine drinkers driving growth with growth in wine coming from women, Gen X and those already connected with wine.
  3. Non-food occasions driving wine growth bringing opportunity for wine to migrate to occasions where other beverages have been more dominant in the past.
  4. Slow recovery in average bottle spend on wine in the off-premise but remains below pre-pandemic levels in most markets.
  5. E-commerce for wine comes of age and it is rapidly becoming a new and habitual way of shopping for wine.
  6. Shift to wines seen as a safe choice and ‘localism’ with mainstream and local wine brands winning.
  7. Consumers increasingly cautious in their lifestyles with confident ‘Hedonist’ segment shrinking as 2020 progresses, and an increasing proportion of ‘Halters and Reducers’.
  8. Large scale events off the agenda with consumers seeking to avoid crowds, even when restrictions are lifted and the current dangers of the pandemic have passed.
  9. Travel plans remain on hold with overseas and international travel not on the agenda for wine drinkers, even when travel restrictions are lifted.
  10. Consumers becoming more distant from the on-premise, shifting socializing patterns.
  11. Treat-seeking behavior losing momentum as consumer spending becoming more conservative.
  12. US wine market returns to growth as wine consumption frequency grew strongly in the US, driven by Millennials.

Source: Wine Intelligence Wine Consumer Trends in the Covid-19 Era, published October 2020

 

Young red wine is found to be more beneficial than aged wine, study finds

A recent study of 16 wines from Australia and New Zealand has found levels of healthy antioxidants, existing mainly in red grapes, decreased significantly over time.

CQUniversity lead researcher Mani Naiker said the compound, trans-resveratrol, was proven to have cardiovascular, anti-inflammatory, and anti-diabetic effects.

“The more you consume this compound in your food or in beverages, it is perceived to give you better health benefits,” Dr Naiker said.

“When we compare younger bottled wines with mature red wines, we have proven that as the wine ages the concentration of this important bioactive compound decreases by about 75 percent over a 16-month period.

“That is a huge decrease in the concentration of this particularly important health-benefiting compound.”

Lead researcher Dr. Mani Naiker states that the compound is proven to have cardiovascular, anti-inflammatory, and anti-diabetic effects.

The study published in the Australian Journal of Grape and Wine Research, found the concentration decreased in some wines by as much as 96 percent.

After the initial resveratrol levels were measured, the bottles were resealed and stored in darkness in their original packaging.

“Irrespective to where we got the red wine from, which variety it was, the process of that compound, the loss was the same,” Dr Naiker said.

“I might just leave it with the French paradox that having a glass of red with a meal every day is good for your health.

“Now you know, you might want to go with a young red rather than an old one.”

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/ajgw.12449

Research from University of Cape Town shows old vines add value

Research from the University of Cape Town shows that using old vine fruit earns winemakers more money.

South Africa has finally discovered – and celebrated – its treasure trove of old vineyards. A country that typically renewed its plantings every 15 to 20 years, pretty much as soon as the yields began to decline, was an unlikely candidate to develop a culture of ancient vines.

Part of the reason for the constant renewal of vineyards lies in the history of the industry. Until the modern era, it existed primarily to supply cheap wine to the domestic market and to provide distilling grapes to the local brandy trade. Accordingly, it was planted to high yielding varieties – or at least to varieties which could be induced to increase their yields if the local market preferred quantity to quality.

There was also another reason for the frequent replacement of vineyards: the widespread incidence of leaf-roll virus. Within a few years of a vine reaching productive maturity, the vine leaves, lacking essential chlorophyll, turn russet long before the vintage. Since the vine is unable to convert sunlight into fruit ripeness, as the season advances it shows signs of stress; acidity declines in the grapes while the sugar levels remain resolutely low. Within a few years the yields drop. By the time a vineyard has reached what should be peak maturity it is economically unviable and must be replaced.

In the pre-modern era of the Cape wine industry roughly a third of the national vineyard was Chenin Blanc (putting South Africa’s share at over 50% of the world’s plantings) followed by Cinsaut. The two varieties accounted for half of all vine grapes in South Africa. With the Mandela presidency in 1994 came an extraordinary worldwide demand for Cape wine. Exports, which in 1992 had totaled a mere 21m liters – roughly 2% of total production – doubled and redoubled every year. At the end of the decade they had grown sevenfold to over 140m liters. In 2008 they crossed the 400m liter mark for the first time.

In this post-Apartheid export boom, vineyards were uprooted simply to meet the expectations of a market that wanted Cabernet and Chardonnay rather than Chenin and Cinsaut.

Rescue Plan

A number of initiatives were undertaken to save focus varieties, of which the most important was a campaign launched in the early 1990s to preserve the country’s Chenin heritage. Happily, Chenin is less susceptible to leaf-roll, so there were many older vineyards yielding reasonable quantities of often fabulous fruit. There was less success with Cinsaut: many of the older plantings fell victim to the simple demands of the international supermarket trade and were replaced with Merlot and Shiraz.

In the early 2000s Rosa Kruger, a viticulturist with a passion for the country’s viticultural heritage, began to research and create a record of the country’s oldest vines. Unsurprisingly, most were Chenin, though Grenache, Pinotage (a local crossing of Cinsaut and Pinot Noir), Semillon and Cinsaut were also present in more reduced amounts. At much the same time Eben Sadie, a producer who enjoyed a singular reputation for hand-crafted artisanal wines, began marketing some of these single-site rarities. His lead was followed by many of the younger, and more adventurous, winemakers. Suddenly, for the first time, it seemed as if it could be profitable to farm low yielding ancient vines.

At this point Johann Rupert, whose family had started one of the country’s major liquor companies and had then gone on to create Richemont (whose brands include Dunhill, Cartier and Mont Blanc), provided the seed capital to launch what is now known as the Old Vine Project. Making use of Rosa Kruger’s catalogue of the old vines, it identified just over 3,800ha of heritage vineyards, and then persuaded the authorities to certify wines produced exclusively from them.

In 2019 the University of Cape Town’s Graduate School of Business conducted research into the value that old vines bring to the selling price of the wines: its primary objective was to determine whether, given the inevitably lower yields associated with older vineyards, it was actually viable (from an economic rather than a sentimental perspective) to keep them in the ground.

Price Advantage

The research was able to quantify the retail price advantage of old vine fruit: all other factors being equal, it added R100 ($5.70) per bottle to the final product. Given that most wines sold from these varietals retail for less than R200, the connection to an old vineyard was significant – at this stage an estimated 30% to 50%. Typically, the fruit cost of a bottle of wine comprises a low percentage of the final selling price. Stellenbosch grape prices average less than R12000 per ton, or R20 per liter. Dry goods, oaking and processing cost would take this to R50. These are largely constant, unless a producer opts to use a high percentage of new wood. Doubling the fruit price only raises the input costs by 40%. If certified old vines add R100 to the price of a bottle of wine, this potentially means that grape prices could increase from R12000 to somewhere close to R60000.

This amount of upward price mobility is vast in the South Africa context: it more than compensates for the lower yields. Johann Rupert’s investment in the Old Vine Project has proved, beyond doubt, that well-sited virus-free older vines are worth nursing to the magical age of 35 years – at which point they acquire the Certified Heritage Vineyard seal. It may seem strange that the country’s most famous luxury goods mogul’s true legacy – at least in the world of wine – will rest on an act of generosity aimed at saving a dwindling number of old vines. But it is also apt. It is the combination of quality and rarity which ensures that there’s nothing artificial about the premium: on reflection, that has always been the unique selling proposition of the luxury goods business.

Source:  Wine Business International