“World of Zero” to dominate Hall 1 at ProWein 2023

Alcohol-free or “zero” wines are a trending topic with quite some potential. Kylie Minogue is launching her first non-alcoholic sparkling rosé wine of the same name, to be sold in British Tesco supermarkets, among other locations. “Zero” is also playing an increasingly important role in food service.

Increased health awareness and changing consumer behavior among Generation “Z,” i.e. 26- to 37-year-olds, are the main reasons for the trend. Growing health awareness may be a factor, with consumers opting for alcohol-free options on visits to pubs and bars as part of a moderate approach to drinking. Equally, generational shifts play a role, with 65% of members of Gen Z (those born between 1997 and 2012) expressing a desire to moderate their alcohol intake, according to a survey.

With its “World of Zero”, ProWein (March 19 – 21, 2023 in Düsseldorf, Germany) is picking up on this trend and proactively setting the stage for it. Whereas the non-alcoholic products were previously distributed throughout the exhibition halls at the stands of the corresponding producers, importers, and exporters, they will now be concentrated in one area in Hall 1.

“For our trade visitors from food service and retail this is the ideal platform to comprehensively, and above all efficiently, gather information on this segment,” explained Michael Degen, Executive Director Messe Düsseldorf, and adds: “This provides exhibitors with easier access to new buyers for their new products and allows visitors, in turn, to locate this new product group faster.” Thus, on the one hand, companies are represented in the “World of Zero” that are located in other halls with their main stand and are now additionally presenting themselves in this theme world. These include Schlumberger, Peter Riegel, and Schloss Wachenheim, to name a few examples. On the other hand, there are also exhibitors in the “World of Zero” who are exclusively represented there – such as Kolonne Null from Berlin or Manufaktur Jörg Geiger.

#nonalcoholicwines #prowein #proweintradefair #winebusiness #wineprofessionals #winetasting #wineshop #winetrends #tradefair #winetradefair #winenews #worldofzero #Alcoholfree #wineinfluencer

 

 

 

 

 

Rosé Wine Trends: Provence continues to influence

Valladolid, Spain hosted the recent Rosé Wine Session of the 2022 Concours Mondial de Bruxelles. The competition took place March 11 – 13 at the Patio Herreriano.

Along with sixty international judges, also in attendance was the Mayor of Valladolid, Óscar Puente; the Town Councillor, Ana Redondo; the Chairman of the Concours Mondial de Bruxelles, Baudouin Havaux; and Vice-Chairman of the Valladolid Provincial Council, Víctor Alonso.

Valladolid Wine Region

Valladolid is the only province on the Iberian Peninsula that boasts five appellations: Cigales, Rueda, Ribera del Duero, Toro and León. There are over 27,000 hectares planted with over twenty different grape varieties. It is also home to four wine routes: Cigales, Rueda, Toro and Ribera del Duero.

Rosé Market

Between 2002 and 2018, the global consumption of rosé wine rose from 18.3 million hectolitres to over 26 million, representing a surge of almost 40%. Western Europe and the United States are the world’s largest consumers of rosé.

Rosé Trends: Interview with Nathalie Pouzalgues, for Concours Mondial de Bruxelles

Nathalie Pouzalgues, winemaker, and project manager with the Centre for Rosé Research in Vidauban, Var.

  1. When did you begin your work on rosé wines?

I joined the team at the Rosé Wine Centre in 2011, but before that I worked at the Côtes de Provence producers’ organization. The Rosé Wine Centre was established in 1999, on the initiative of the Provence wine industry (CIVP and Var Chamber of Agriculture) and the French Vine & Wine Institute. It is a one-of-a-kind resource in France and worldwide for applied research into rosé wines. Our aim is to improve the quality of rosé wines by conducting experiments that range from the vine itself through to the bottled wine. My role within the team is to run experiments focusing on rosé wine and I specialise in applied research on sensory wine analysis.

  1. Where does the information for your research come from?

Research programmes involving either viticulture, oenology or sensory analysis are regularly submitted at different levels. Depending on the research topic, we do agronomy monitoring, small-batch winemaking (100 litres) and/or tastings. The research findings are processed using a range of statistical tools and then passed on to industry members through scientific and technical journals, video-conferences, symposiums, etc.

  1. How have rosé wines changed over the past decade?

The quality of rosé wines has improved. From a technical perspective, temperature control from harvesting the grapes through to storing the wine in bottles was one of the first noteworthy advances. The second breakthrough stems from oxygen management, controlling oxidation and now planning vineyard management designed for rosé wine. You don’t manage a vineyard in the same way if you aim to make rosé or red wine.

  1. Rosé sales in France account for approximately 30% of the market, ahead of white wine. Why is rosé so popular in France?

The quality of French rosé is indisputable. Some regions, such as Provence, are iconic. It is also important to realise how attached the French are to the way rosé is drunk – it is relaxed, unconventional and sociable.

  1. There is an international trend towards paler, drier rosés. In your opinion, what is driving this trend, and will it continue in the future?

The motivation for making drier, paler rosé wines is definitely a bid to replicate the Provence rosé model of delicate, light, fruity wines. There is no way of knowing whether this trend will continue, but we do know that it is not just a passing fad. Rosé wines from Provence have always been in this category. They have a very light colour and are aromatic with floral, fruity and mineral notes. On the palate, they are rounded yet dry, with very fruity, refreshing notes that often recall citrus and tropical fruit.

  1. Which countries predominantly adopt this style?

As far as I know, this is a widespread phenomenon and affects various French regions and different countries. Areas with a Mediterranean climate and grape varieties are certainly better equipped to produce the light, fruity, rounded yet dry wines that consumers currently favour.

  1. Does the international trend for paler rosés affect those from Provence?

The trend may lead to some confusion but conversely, it strengthens Provence’s status as a benchmark. If the colours are similar, this creates a whole new ballgame, shifting emphasis to aromas and flavours. And here too, we are ahead of the curve. The vineyards of Provence are genuine rosé terroirs.

  1. Are certain grape varieties better suited to producing pale, dry rosé wines?

Grape varieties with less colour that deliver fruitiness seem to be better suited to producing pale, dry rosé wines because their fruitiness creates an impression of sweetness when actually the wines are dry.

  1. In your experience, is protecting traditional rosé production techniques and the use of local (native) grape varieties still a trend?

Yes, for a significant part. High-tech methods and expertise do not rule out the use of ancient techniques (concrete, terracotta or wooden vessels, a curb on sulphites, etc.) and traditional grape varieties (Rosé du Var).

Source:  Concours Mondial

 

Italian Grape Prices Are Now Listed Online

The Unione Italiano Vini (UIV), in collaboration with the Association of Wine Commissaries (MEd.&A.), has set up an online service showing trends in grape pricing. Just in time for the harvest season, the Osservatorio provides daily average quotations for 15 key grape varieties (in English and Italian).

This information is available via a free trial, but the paid subscription offers a much broader range of data including weekly prices for 450 varieties of wine and must, stretching back over a decade, as well as information on global trends.

Website:

https://www.osservatoriodelvino.it/uve/medea

 

#winetrade #wineharvest #wine #winelovers #wineries #italianwine #winetrends #winenews #italianwinelovers #instawine #italy #grapevarieties #wineeconomics #wineobservatory #italianwineries #winebusiness #winetech #winetechnology

Wine Grounds Launches Machine Learning-Based Vintage Scores

Wine Grounds announced this week a revolutionary new vintage quality feature to their food and wine pairing app, Grape Base. Their data-driven approach to determining the quality of a vintage allows industry professionals and consumers to see scores for any wine-growing region in the world. By utilizing machine learning and a proprietary weather model, Grape Base can instantly predict the overall quality of a vintage based on the weather during the growing season, at harvest and throughout the winter.

Grape Base is taking a hyper-local approach to vintage quality and creating scores for the top varietals grown in every officially recognized region, district and or appellation across the globe. Vintage scores will be continually expanded on and made available after the end of harvest in the northern and southern hemispheres. Industry professionals can use the data to make purchasing decisions and project trends in consumer buying habits.

Wine Grounds Founder Chris Hall states, “By tracking and evaluating the weather of a specific region and comparing that to the ideal conditions for the grapes grown there, we can predict the quality of the vintage for those grapes. You can then use those scores to pick the best vintage in a wine shop, from your own rack or out to eat. Somms can ahead on building wine programs that showcase varietals at their very best. It is absolute revolution in wine tech.”

Highlights Include:

  • Weather model can be applied to any region in the world for any grape and it is continuously learning and improving
  • 75+ regions available with scores for the past ten years
  • Search allows users to find scores by region or grape varietal
  • Monthly subscriptions start at US $1.99 after a one-month free trial
  • Grape Base is available in the Apple Store and on Google Play

#wine #winewednesday #wednesday #winetrends #businessofwine #tech #winegrounds #machinelearning #vintagewines #vintagescores #foodandwineapp #somms #wineandfoodpairing #app #AI #winelovers #instawine #wineinstagram #winelife #winemarketing #socialmediamarketing

Wine-Based Cocktails Drive Interest, As Wine Looks To Expand Its Audience

As the summer-selling season began in earnest and the demand for pre-packaged drinks continues to trend up, leading wine marketers have been busy maneuvering amidst a tricky economic landscape—trying to bridge the gap between the general market and craft cocktail enthusiasts. Buoyed by last year’s off-premise surge, a slew of wine-based ready-to-drink cocktails have thrived, even though they’re still dwarfed by much bigger malt-based counterparts—especially in the hard seltzer and iced tea arenas. Spirits-based RTDs have also had a big headstart and offer stiff competition for shelf space. Most wine industry players haven’t yet fully participated in the wine-based cocktail category, but that could soon change.

The biggest label in the category is Patco Brands’ Rancho La Gloria, a line of wine-based RTD Margaritas at 13.9% abv. Launched in 2011, it skyrocketed to 1.3 million 9-liter cases last year—up more than 200% from 2019—according to Impact Databank. Gluten-free and made with 100% Blue Weber agave wine, Rancho La Gloria is also sold in canned and popsicle packaging formats, aside from the traditional 750-ml. bottle. Southern Champion’s Buzzballz Chillers is a wine-based offshoot from its larger spirits-based cousin, BuzzBallz. Featuring a lineup of flavors such as Horchata, Lotta Colada, and Hazelnut Latte, Buzzballz Chillers debuted in 2019 and depleted 375,000 cases last year.

The biggest industry player investing in the wine-based cocktail arena is E.&J. Gallo, with its launch of Barefoot Hard Seltzer—which depleted over half-a-million cases in 2020, according to Impact Databank. The line includes Pineapple & Passion Fruit, Cherry & Cranberry, Peach & Nectarine, and Strawberry & Guava flavors that are at 4% abv and retail at $8 a 4-pack and $20 for a variety 12-pack. Aside from seltzer, Gallo also previously introduced Barefoot Spritzer in the canned RTD category—retailing at $3 a 250-ml. can or $9 a four-pack, the spritzer range has an abv of 5.5% and comes in Moscato, Rosé, Summer Red, Crisp White, Red Sangria and Pinot Grigio expressions.

Wine-based cocktails more than doubled in size last year to over 5 million cases overall—according to Impact Databank—and in a space of less than 10 years have already begun to outsell the entire dessert/fortified wine and vermouth/aperitif segments combined. Wine RTDs continue to do well in 2021 as off-premise volumes surged 72% in the half-year ending May 22 in Nielsen channels.

Retail dollars grew even faster, soaring 86% to $161.3 million the past 26 weeks, as higher-priced cocktails profited from drinkers trading up from flavored malt beverages. And although wine-based RTDs have undoubtedly benefited from the off-premise boom during the pandemic, further investment from other major players is expected to keep the category on the rise even after the economy fully recovers.

Leading Wine-Based RTDs In The U.S.
(thousands of 9-liter case depletions)
BrandCompany20192020Percent
Change
1
Rancho La GloriaPatco Brands4271,300204.5%
Barefoot SeltzerE.&J. Gallo Winery525+
BuzzBallz ChillersSouthern Champion23341477.3%
BeatboxFuture Proof Brands10019898.5%
UptownSouthern Champion8142+
FlybirdDon Sebastiani & Sons1107+
Total Top Five27692,685249.2%
1 Based on unrounded data.
Source: IMPACT DATABANK © 2021

Sources:
Shanken News
Impact DataBank

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