Wine Industry Predictions for 2022 – Wine Intelligence

Wine Intelligence, a global leader in wine consumer research and insights has come up with five predictions for 2022.

Firstly, beverage alcohol has proven to be one of the most resilient product categories in the world in the Covid era, in part due to the industry’s ability to innovate and pivot from a largely restricted or closed channel (the on-premise) to more accessible channels such as e-commerce and convenience retail, where regulation allowed.

The challenges that face the wine industry in 2022 will be similar to those facing beverage alcohol as a whole and consumer goods generally: keep costs down while persuading consumers to trade up; improving the substance as well as the image of the category in light of increasing demands from governments for a step-change commitment to environmental and social responsibility; and making the product relevant to the next generation of legal drinking age consumers.

Here are Wine Intelligence’s five predictions for 2022:

1. Global wine will get serious about ‘light-weighting’ – reducing glass packaging weight

Despite many worthy efforts over the past 3 decades, the wine industry has yet to find a way of peeling consumers away from their love of a 75cl glass bottle. Part of the problem is that glass bottles work so well from a consumer point of view: they seem more environmentally friendly than plastic, they convey reassurance by reflecting the values, tradition, and quality of wine, and they look good on a table. Last month, we reported consumer research that showed 55% considered glass to be a ‘sustainable’ form of wine packaging, compared with 35% who thought that a bag-in-box was sustainable.

Why does this matter? A standard glass wine bottle, with a typical dry weight of 500g, accounts for 29% of a wine’s carbon footprint, according to a 2011 study by PE International for the Wine Institute of California. However, there are many bottles for still wine out there which tip the scales at substantially more – with a dry weight of nearly a kilo in some cases, which pushes packaging’s share of wine’s carbon output to close to 50%, and the total carbon output up by around 10%, according to the same PE study. A lightweight bottle reduces packaging’s share substantially – by roughly 1g of carbon per gram of glass, depending on the proportion of recycled glass used, and that’s before any transportation saving. Remove the aluminium foil capsule, throw in a natural cork (and count the full benefit of carbon sequestration in a cork forest, as calculated by a study from EY, commissioned by cork manufacturer Amorim in 2019), and you have a product who’s packaging is almost carbon neutral.
Why will this change in 2022? Influential figures in the wine industry, such as Jancis Robinson MW and Tim Atkin MW, have long campaigned against heavy wine bottles. Now this powerful group of influencers is rallying a growing coalition to their cause. Crucially, this now includes major retailers, who will use their buying power (and the need to meet their own carbon reduction targets) to strong-arm suppliers into committing to lightweight glass where possible (sparkling wine will still need heavier glass to cope with gas pressure). More pragmatically, strains on the global supply chain, in terms of raw material cost increases, rising fuel and transportation costs, and retailer reluctance to pass costs on to consumers, will force producers to seek out savings wherever they are available. Unnecessary packaging will seem an obvious place to start.

2. Luxury wine will need to burnish sustainability credentials

What does luxury mean today? Chewing over this topic at a gathering organised by upscale Provence wine producer Chene Bleu in London’s Linley Gallery a few weeks ago, Lucia van der Post, the leading style guru and Financial Times columnist, was unequivocal: “luxury will have to show that it is sustainable to appeal to younger consumers”. Her thesis, and that of Xavier Rolet, co-owner of Chene Bleu and former CEO of the London Stock Exchange, was that luxury brands will need to work out how to align their values, and actions, with those of the next generation of consumers. In practice this means committing as much to acting sustainably – both in human and environmental terms. The challenge for luxury brands in general, and luxury wine in particular, is to do this while not compromising the quality of the product itself.

How will this play out in 2022? Around the world, wine drinkers are trading down in volume, and trading up in quality (see also Prediction 3, below), and luxury wine is currently one of the main beneficiaries of this trend. However, when the tide of disposable income starts to ebb, as it surely will when inflation starts eating away at household incomes and travel reopens fully in the next year, consumers are likely to become more discriminatory in how they spend their money. The usual quality-and-heritage pitch will no longer be sufficient.

3. The premiumization train will keep on rolling in 2022

One of the most notable silver linings of the pandemic for the wine industry has been consumers’ willingness to transfer the budgets they would have spent in going out and travel into higher quality food and beverages for the home. After an initial blip during the first period of lockdown, the premium and super-premium price categories of wine, which in the US context means wines selling for USD 10-20 and over USD 20 per bottle respectively, have bounced back by +2-4% in volume terms in the first 6 months of 2021, according to IWSR data. At the very top end, the Liv-Ex Fine Wine 100 Index, which measures the prices of the most sought-after fine wines in the secondary market, hit an all-time high in October, capping an impressive 17 month run of increases.
The trend to spend a bit more has of course been with us since well before Covid and is closely linked with the trend to drink less volume of wine.

Wine Intelligence data shows that 39% of consumers in key consumption markets around the world are actively moderating their wine consumption, rising to over 50% in markets such as Netherlands and Switzerland. Wine producers have also been innovating and promoting their premium offerings assiduously, as the profit margins on these products are orders of magnitude higher compared with low-priced wines, thanks largely to the impact of fixed value taxes that are levied on alcohol by volume.

Three factors will fuel the wine premiumization train in 2022: the reluctance of some consumers – particularly the Boomer cohort –to re-engage with the on-premise and travel, which will reserve more of their budgets for at-home entertaining; the increasing influence of Millennials within most wine markets, who have been the biggest drivers of the drink-less-but-better movement; and a nasty inflationary crunch in the supply chain, combining the disastrous northern hemisphere wine harvest of 2021, which the OIV estimates reduced wine volumes by an estimated 18%, and rising energy, dry goods and transport costs.

4. Wine in cans will become low-alcohol wine RTDs in cans (and small bottles)

Canned wine made huge strides in 2021, both from a technical and a sales point of view, and this will continue in 2022. However, the big innovation will come from industry building new product sub-categories in wine that hit both of the growing trends of the 2020s: wine in a portable, single serve format, with a low-alcohol formulation that turns it from wine to a wine-based sparkling drink. The continued growth of RTDs, especially in the US, is being led by an unprecedented bout of innovation in the category, and remains on course to grow substantially in 2022, according to forecasts from the IWSR. More astute RTD manufacturers are looking for ways in which they can premiumize their offering (tapping into the same trends as discussed in Prediction #3, above), which at the moment is largely focused around spirits-based beverages, using premium branded whiskies, rums and gins to drive consumer demand up the price ladder. There is also an increasing focus on flavour, according to the IWSR’s in-house market experts, which will see a shakeout of poorly formulated, low-value RTDs. Eventually, we think, the same logic of successful RTD innovation – marquee brands, better flavours – will be applied to premium wine products. We expect the first movers here will be the sparkling wine producers, especially Champagne houses with an eye on extending their reach into the low alcohol / single serve space.

5. Wine industry needs to do battle for global talent
Most of the wine industry would agree that it is a fun place to work. Unlike most other industries, wine can offer a unrivalled mix of intellectual challenges. What other industry requires its leaders to be part-farmer, part-chemist, part-production expert, part-salesperson, and part-marketing guru? In recent years it has attracted talented, well-educated, and passionate people from the Millennial generation, drawn by its vast complexity, heritage, and multifaceted work challenges, as well as the romantic notions of working in harmony with nature that wine still manages to conjure.

That’s the good news. The more troubling news is that there are now many other exciting things for the next generation of global talent to work on. The war for their services is taking on a new dimension, driven primarily by the rise of global technology giants backed by vast quantities of investment cash. True, working for TikTok may not offer time in a field, bottling line or upscale retailer, but the financial rewards can be astounding. For the moment, the battle for talent is being fought in other sectors – global accountancy and financial services firms are finding their conveyor belt of talent picked apart by the top technology firms, who can offer starting salaries of well over USD 100,000 per year, according to research published by Payscale.

In on-premise, a field much closer to the wine industry, a corresponding re-valuation of talent is already happening. A survey of its own job postings released in June 2021 by Reed, the largest recruitment agency in the UK, found that hospitality and catering staff jobs were being advertised with salaries 18% higher on average in May 2021 compared with the previous year. The most eye-opening number in this survey was the 43% increase in salaries offered for restaurant kitchen staff.

While wages are obviously important to workers, they are not the only thing that matters. Surveys of younger workers from the Millennial and Gen-Z age cohorts focus on consistent requirements from employment: being part of an ethically sound business, transparency and fairness in the workplace, purpose, autonomy, and opportunities to develop. As with many other industries, wine is going to need to up its game in 2022, not just in terms of money, but also in its ability to offer more holistic rewards to its workforce.

So, what are your thoughts on this? Do you have anything else to add?

#wine #winelover #winetasting #redwine #winebusiness #winetime #winelovers #instawine #whitewine #winestagram #wineoclock #winecountry #wines #winelife #winenight #winewednesday #winenews #winetrade #wineindustry #wineintelligence #wineeconomics
#wine2022 #winetrends

Wine Intelligence’s Industry Predictions for 2022

Beverage alcohol has proven to be one of the most resilient product categories in the world in the Covid era, in part thanks to the drinks industry’s ability to innovate and pivot from a largely restricted or closed channel – the on-premise – to more accessible channels such as e-commerce and convenience retail, where regulation allowed.

The challenges that face the wine industry next year and beyond will be similar to those facing beverage alcohol as a whole and consumer goods generally: keep costs down while persuading consumers to trade up; improving the substance as well as the image of the category in light of increasing demands from governments for a step-change commitment to environmental and social responsibility; and making the product relevant to the next generation of legal drinking age consumers.

Here are Wine Intelligence’s five predictions for 2022:

  1. Global wine will get serious about ‘light-weighting’ – reducing glass packaging weight

Despite many worthy efforts over the past 3 decades, the wine industry has yet to find a way of peeling consumers away from their love of a 75cl glass bottle. Part of the problem is that glass bottles work so well from a consumer point of view: they seem more environmentally friendly than plastic, they convey reassurance by reflecting the values, tradition, and quality of wine, and they look good on a table. Last month, we reported consumer research that showed 55% considered glass to be a ‘sustainable’ form of wine packaging, compared with 35% who thought that a bag-in-box was sustainable.

Why does this matter? A standard glass wine bottle, with a typical dry weight of 500g, accounts for 29% of a wine’s carbon footprint, according to a 2011 study by PE International for the Wine Institute of California. However, there are many bottles for still wine out there which tip the scales at substantially more – with a dry weight of nearly a kilo in some cases, which pushes packaging’s share of wine’s carbon output to close to 50%, and the total carbon output up by around 10%, according to the same PE study. A lightweight bottle reduces packaging’s share substantially – by roughly 1g of carbon per gram of glass, depending on the proportion of recycled glass used, and that’s before any transportation saving. Remove the aluminium foil capsule, throw in a natural cork (and count the full benefit of carbon sequestration in a cork forest, as calculated by a study from EY, commissioned by cork manufacturer Amorim in 2019), and you have a product who’s packaging is almost carbon neutral.

Why will this change in 2022? Influential figures in the wine industry, such as Jancis Robinson MW and Tim Atkin MW, have long campaigned against heavy wine bottles. Now this powerful group of influencers is rallying a growing coalition to their cause. Crucially, this now includes major retailers, who will use their buying power (and the need to meet their own carbon reduction targets) to strong-arm suppliers into committing to lightweight glass where possible (sparkling wine will still need heavier glass to cope with gas pressure). More pragmatically, strains on the global supply chain, in terms of raw material cost increases, rising fuel and transportation costs, and retailer reluctance to pass costs on to consumers, will force producers to seek out savings wherever they are available. Unnecessary packaging will seem an obvious place to start.

  1. Luxury wine will need to burnish sustainability credentials

What does luxury mean today? Chewing over this topic at a gathering organized by upscale Provence wine producer Chene Bleu in London’s Linley Gallery a few weeks ago, Lucia van der Post, the leading style guru and Financial Times columnist, was unequivocal: “luxury will have to show that it is sustainable to appeal to younger consumers”. Her thesis, and that of Xavier Rolet, co-owner of Chene Bleu and former CEO of the London Stock Exchange, was that luxury brands will need to work out how to align their values, and actions, with those of the next generation of consumers. In practice this means committing as much to acting sustainably – both in human and environmental terms. The challenge for luxury brands in general, and luxury wine in particular, is to do this while not compromising the quality of the product itself.

How will this play out in 2022? Around the world, wine drinkers are trading down in volume, and trading up in quality (see also Prediction 3, below), and luxury wine is currently one of the main beneficiaries of this trend. However, when the tide of disposable income starts to ebb, as it surely will when inflation starts eating away at household incomes and travel reopens fully in the next year, consumers are likely to become more discriminatory in how they spend their money. The usual quality-and-heritage pitch will no longer be sufficient.

  1. The premiumization train will keep on rolling in 2022

One of the most notable silver linings of the pandemic for the wine industry has been consumers’ willingness to transfer the budgets they would have spent in going out and travel into higher quality food and beverages for the home. After an initial blip during the first period of lockdown, the premium and super-premium price categories of wine, which in the US context means wines selling for USD 10-20 and over USD 20 per bottle respectively, have bounced back by +2-4% in volume terms in the first 6 months of 2021, according to IWSR data. At the very top end, the Liv-Ex Fine Wine 100 Index, which measures the prices of the most sought-after fine wines in the secondary market, hit an all-time high in October, capping an impressive 17 month run of increases.

The trend to spend a bit more has of course been with us since well before Covid, and is closely linked with the trend to drink less volume of wine. Wine Intelligence data shows that 39% of consumers in key consumption markets around the world are actively moderating their wine consumption, rising to over 50% in markets such as Netherlands and Switzerland. Wine producers have also been innovating and promoting their premium offerings assiduously, as the profit margins on these products are orders of magnitude higher compared with low-priced wines, thanks largely to the impact of fixed value taxes that are levied on alcohol by volume.

Three factors will fuel the wine premiumization train in 2022: the reluctance of some consumers – particularly the Boomer cohort –to re-engage with the on-premise and travel, which will reserve more of their budgets for at-home entertaining; the increasing influence of Millennials within most wine markets, who have been the biggest drivers of the drink-less-but-better movement; and a nasty inflationary crunch in the supply chain, combining the disastrous northern hemisphere wine harvest of 2021, which the OIV estimates reduced wine volumes by an estimated 18%, and rising energy, dry goods and transport costs.

  1. Wine in cans will become low-alcohol wine RTDs in cans (and small bottles)

Canned wine made huge strides in 2021, both from a technical and a sales point of view, and this will continue in 2022. However, the big innovation will come from industry building new product sub-categories in wine that hit both of the growing trends of the 2020s: wine in a portable, single serve format, with a low-alcohol formulation that turns it from wine to a wine-based sparkling drink. The continued growth of RTDs, especially in the US, is being led by an unprecedented bout of innovation in the category, and remains on course to grow substantially in 2022, according to forecasts from the IWSR. More astute RTD manufacturers are looking for ways in which they can premiumize their offering (tapping into the same trends as discussed in Prediction #3, above), which at the moment is largely focused around spirits-based beverages, using premium branded whiskies, rums and gins to drive consumer demand up the price ladder. There is also an increasing focus on flavour, according to the IWSR’s in-house market experts, which will see a shakeout of poorly formulated, low-value RTDs. Eventually, we think, the same logic of successful RTD innovation – marquee brands, better flavours – will be applied to premium wine products. We expect the first movers here will be the sparkling wine producers, especially Champagne houses with an eye on extending their reach into the low alcohol / single serve space.

  1. Wine industry needs to do battle for global talent

Most of the wine industry would agree that it is a fun place to work. Unlike most other industries, wine can offer a unrivalled mix of intellectual challenges. What other industry requires its leaders to be part-farmer, part-chemist, part-production expert, part-salesperson, and part-marketing guru? In recent years it has attracted talented, well-educated and passionate people from the Millennial generation, drawn by its vast complexity, heritage and multifaceted work challenges, as well as the romantic notions of working in harmony with nature that wine still manages to conjure.

That’s the good news. The more troubling news is that there are now many other exciting things for the next generation of global talent to work on. The war for their services is taking on a new dimension, driven primarily by the rise of global technology giants backed by vast quantities of investment cash. True, working for TikTok may not offer time in a field, bottling line or upscale retailer, but the financial rewards can be astounding. For the moment, the battle for talent is being fought in other sectors – global accountancy and financial services firms are finding their conveyor belt of talent picked apart by the top technology firms, who can offer starting salaries of well over USD 100,000 per year, according to research published by Payscale.

In on-premise, a field much closer to the wine industry, a corresponding re-valuation of talent is already happening. A survey of its own job postings released in June 2021 by Reed, the largest recruitment agency in the UK, found that hospitality and catering staff jobs were being advertised with salaries 18% higher on average in May 2021 compared with the previous year. The most eye-opening number in this survey was the 43% increase in salaries offered for restaurant kitchen staff.

While wages are obviously important to workers, they are not the only thing that matters. Surveys of younger workers from the Millennial and Gen-Z age cohorts focus on consistent requirements from employment: being part of an ethically sound business, transparency and fairness in the workplace, purpose, autonomy, and opportunities to develop. As with many other industries, wine is going to need to up its game in 2022, not just in terms of money, but also in its ability to offer more holistic rewards to its workforce.

#winetrends #wine #winelovers #instawine #winenews #wineeconomics #winebusiness #wineintelligence #finewine #luxurywine #rtds #wineinstagram

IWSR announces acquisition of Wine Intelligence

IWSR Drinks Market Analysis, the leading authority on the worldwide beverage alcohol industry, today announced the acquisition of London-based Wine Intelligence, the top global experts on wine consumer research and insights. The combined offering provides the industry with robust insight into consumption trends, consumer behavior and growth opportunities for the global beverage alcohol sector.

Founded in 2002, Wine Intelligence conducts projects on behalf of wine businesses in more than 35 wine markets. This acquisition enables the IWSR and Wine Intelligence teams to build a world-class consumer behavior division focused exclusively on the global beverage alcohol industry.

“As Covid-19 reshapes consumer behavior and beverage alcohol drinking occasions, industry stakeholders are looking for a deeper understanding of the consumer attitudes driving the market,” remarks Mark Meek, CEO of IWSR. “Our vision is shaped by our clients, and this acquisition is a tremendous opportunity for us to expand on our existing offerings and work with the Wine Intelligence team to provide the industry with access to comprehensive consumer insight across all categories of the drinks industry, including beer, wine, spirits and the ready-to-drink sector.”

This acquisition follows a successful decade-long relationship between IWSR and Wine Intelligence. Recent collaborations include the IWSR Covid-19 Consumer Tracker, an in-depth consumer sentiment research report series tracking the on-going impact of Covid-19 on the consumption of and attitude to beverage alcohol over an 18-month period.

“We are delighted to join the IWSR family after nearly 10 years of our organizations partnering on behalf of our client base,” says Lulie Halstead, CEO of Wine Intelligence. “I share Mark’s vision of us building a world-class and comprehensive offering of data and consumer insights to support the global beverage alcohol sectors, which we are uniquely positioned to do.”

About the IWSR

The IWSR is the leading source of data and intelligence on the alcoholic beverage market. The IWSR’s database, essential to the industry, quantifies the global market of wine, spirits, beer, cider, and RTDs (ready-to-drink) by volume and value in 160 countries, and provides insight into short- and long-term trends, including five-year volume and value forecasts. The IWSR tracks overall consumption and trends at brand, price segment and category level. Our data is used by the major international wine, spirits and beer companies, as well as financial and alcoholic beverage market suppliers. The IWSR’s unique methodology allows us to get closer to what is actually consumed and better understand how markets work. The IWSR boasts a team of global analysts, each of whom is equipped with local market expertise and an expansive network of on-the-ground industry contacts. Our analysts meet and speak with their industry contacts throughout the year in order to capture local insight, key market trends, and the ‘why’ behind the numbers. For more information about the IWSR, please visit www.theiwsr.com

About Wine Intelligence

Wine Intelligence is the global leader in wine consumer research and insights. Founded in 2002, we now conduct projects on behalf of wine businesses in more than 35 wine markets. With a team made up of wine industry and research specialists, we offer a broad range of research, insights and strategy services to help wine businesses make better and more profitable business decisions.

US Drinkers Have Increased Wine Consumption During Lockdown

America’s 77 million regular wine drinkers upped their frequency of wine consumption during the pandemic lockdown, despite the closure of many on-premise establishments, according to new consumer research out this week.

The new Wine Intelligence US COVID-19 Impact Report polled a nationally representative sample of 2,000 monthly US wine drinkers during March and April 2020 to understand how their wine drinking behavior was changing as a result of the restrictions due to the coronavirus. The findings paint a picture of a nation finding new occasions for wine drinking – at lunchtime, or catching up with friends online, or replacing the trip to the restaurant with a more indulgent evening meal.

The growing volume of wine purchased was tempered by a small decline in the average price per bottle paid overall, according to the research. However, within this average were significant variations by consumer type. More involved and committed wine drinkers, who mainly spend between $15 and $20 per bottle normally, tended to spend a bit more than usual, while less frequent wine drinkers tended to spend a bit less.

There was significant growth in online shopping across all age groups, with the most likely users of online channels being younger, urban, affluent consumers. This same demographic, who in normal times are more likely to drink wine in social settings such as bars and restaurants, also tended to spend more on take-home purchases.

While the majority of respondents said the origin of wine they bought during this period stayed the same, there was a notable shift in purchase preferences towards domestic wines and away from imports. Some 18% of respondents reported buying more wine from California and other US regions during this time, while 20% said they were buying less wine from France, Italy and Spain. Additionally, US wine drinkers increased their trust in California wines and conversely, lost trust most among old world wines, particularly those from Italy.

Looking to the future, US wine drinkers, on the whole, expressed caution about going out to bars and restaurants immediately after lockdown restrictions were ended – around 40% said they would be less likely to visit a restaurant, while 27% said they would be more likely.

Analysis of this data suggests there is a distinct attitudinal contrast at work among consumers. At one extreme is an optimistic and active group who have made minimal changes to their lifestyle and are less nervous about returning to the on-premise – they tend to be younger, more affluent and city-based, and comprise about 17% of monthly wine drinkers. At the other extreme, 20% of monthly wine drinkers have reacted strongly to the lockdown, and have significantly cut down on spending and wine consumption, and are very reluctant to return to an active social life.

The Wine Intelligence US COVID-19 Impact Report will be published on the 6th of May 2020. It includes latest insights pre, during and predicted post-COVID-19 restrictions, including beverage repertoire, wine buying and consumption behaviors, brand health and lifestyle behavior changes.

Commenting on the report, Wine Intelligence CEO Lulie Halstead said: “Our data supports other evidence that shows that US wine drinking is holding up and that sales will continue to be solid once lockdown ends. In fact, there are clear opportunities with certain consumer segments right now and also in the medium term as we move to post-lockdown behavior. Looking ahead, the US wine drinker is understandably quite cautious about their household finances and the idea of getting on a plane. Thankfully for the wine category, their intention seems to be replacing big treats like vacations and big events with small treats like a nicer bottle of wine.”

Source:  Wine Intelligence

Sustainable, Organic, Lower-alcohol and Alternative Wine go Mainstream

A recent Sola Report from Wine Intelligence highlights that there is a huge opportunity for the industry to produce more alternative wines.

The Sola Report is an acronym for the alternative wines sector, which includes sustainable, organic, lower-alcohol and other alternative wines. The Sola Report tracks how the alternative wine market changes from year to year, and includes an opportunity index, which crosses 11 markets and 12 sub-categories – this determines where Sola wines have the greatest chance of success.

Emily Carroll, who compiled the report for Wine Intelligence, said the “prominence of the organic movement continues to be evident: organic wine tops the Sola wine opportunity index for the second year in a row, most likely due to the popularity of organic food across the world.

“Following closely behind is Fairtrade wine and generic concept wines ‘sustainably produced’ and ‘environmentally friendly’— all three types associated with a blend of social, economic and environmental responsibility.”

She said increasing awareness among consumers for alternative wines was the result of a “fundamental shift in consumer attitudes, led by the younger generation. What was once seen as ‘hippy’ is now the mainstream, with many consumers, particularly those under the age of 45, adopting socially, environmentally and economically responsible habits. This requires companies to act more ethically responsible and more transparent, which naturally also applies to the wine industry”.

She added that “younger wine drinkers present the most opportunity for alternative wines due to their open-minded attitudes and willingness to invest time, education and money into their health. Young wine drinkers are not only more likely to purchase alternative wines such as organic, Fairtrade or sustainable wines compared with older drinkers, but are also more willing in general to pay a premium for wine in the off- and on-trade”.

However, she said, the challenge would be to “engage this cohort with the alternative wine category, as younger consumers are very much attuned to other drinks categories, like craft beer and gin, and also are less likely to be participants in the alcoholic beverage category to begin with”.

She also said there is “less appeal for alternative wines with more complex titles including orange or skin contact wine as well as biodynamic wine. Interestingly, even though veganism and vegetarianism is on the rise, these two Sola wine categories rank the lowest in the 2019 global Sola wine opportunity index”.

The first Sola report was released in 2018. It surveyed consumer sentiment towards 12 alternative wine types in 11 key wine markets, looking at awareness, purchase intent and affinity towards alternative wines. The 2019 report has been expanded to include vegetarian wine and five new markets and is “now representative of 250 million regular wine drinkers from a broad spread of geography, culture and economic development”.