Direct Train London to Bordeaux Planned for 2020

A direct high speed railway that would take passengers from London to Bordeaux in under five hours could be in operation by 2020, according to the chief executive of the HS1 rail network.

 

Currently travellers from London to Bordeaux have to change trains in Paris. The Paris route takes 5h 25m, including a 1 hour 5 minutes connection in Paris, travelling from London to Bordeaux.

The current return connection in Paris takes 6h 26m, with a longer 1h 55m connection in Paris, owing to the need to pass through border and security controls.

The new direct service would cut travel times to less than five hours in both directions, through a direct route and security controls located in Bordeaux, with trains reaching speeds of up to 200 mph between the two cities.

The proposed route bypasses Paris and takes advantage of a newly completed 302km French high-speed rail line linking the French town of Tours with Bordeaux.

“As we’ve seen with the recent introduction of the Eurostar London-Amsterdam service, there’s a real demand for international train services to provide a comfortable and better-connected service, especially for leisure journeys,” said Dyan Crowther, chief executive of HS1 Ltd.

“This is the first time that railway operators have collaborated in this way and saves the train operator having to do a lot of legwork. The route is almost ready for a train operator to turn up and turn the key as soon as the UK and French Governments agree on border controls.

“With the right commitment, we could be looking at new services in the next couple of years. The service will take passengers direct from city centre to city centre, taking the hassle out of travel to South West France.”

HS1 Ltd, the owner and operator of High Speed 1, is in advanced planning with three other international railway operators along the proposed route, and is working on pre-planned timetable slots and train routes, meaning that a new international train operator will be able to get the route up and running in “a couple of years”.

The four railway operators along the proposed route (HS1 Ltd, Lisea, Eurotunnel and SNCF Réseau) are meeting at the end of April, beginning of May, 2018 to discuss developing a Gare de Bordeaux-Saint-Jean station, to facilitate international departures.

Source Drinks Business, UK

Press Release: Toronto-based award-winning author Liz Palmer named a Dame Chevalier in the Ordre Des Coteaux De Champagne, Paris

Toronto, April 18, 2017 – Liz Palmer was inducted as a Dame Chevalier de Coteaux de Champagne April 7, 2017. The black-tie award ceremony and dinner took place at Ministere des Affairs Etrangers, Paris, with over 300 members of the Ordre, guests and honorees which included restaurateurs, sommeliers, and personalities from the world of politics, media, stage and music.

About Liz Palmer

Liz Palmer is a well-respected wine journalist since 2004 and has an international reputation as a critic and judge. She has had the pleasure of interviewing and tasting with some of the industry’s leading winemakers, professors and personalities.

Her articles have appeared in national and international magazines. She is one of four founding international hosts for #ChampagneDay 2011-2017; she has served as a judge for the 2013-2017 Global Traveler’s Wines on the Wing airline wine competition (New York); 2014-2017 Michelangelo International Wine Awards (South Africa) 2014-2017; and for The Stevie Awards for Women in Business (New York) (2014-2017).

Liz’s memberships include: Wine Writers’ Circle of Canada, Circle of Wine Writers (UK), International Federation of Wine and Spirits Journalists and Writers (FIJEV); Wine Century Club (NYC), The Fine Wine Reserve, Les Dames d’Escoffier (President – Toronto Chapter), and The Ordre de Coteaux de Champagne.

Liz Palmer’s first book, “The Ultimate Guide to Champagne” has received the National Award for the best French Wine Book at the Gourmand World Awards 2017.

Liz continues to support the wines of Champagne through workshops in Toronto and champagne tourism.

Liz Palmer states:

“I am deeply proud to be honoured by the most notable Champagne fraternity in the world.  I would like to sincerely thank Michael Drappier, former Commandeur of the Ordre, and Philippe Manfredini of Champagne J. de Telmont for trusting and believing in me.”

“This evening not only celebrates Champagne but also demonstrates the importance of its name, its history and its tradition, which is unparalleled anywhere else in the world.”

“I’m so happy that my family from London, Canada and France could join me and witness this extraordinary event!”

The evening followed a strict protocol, with an induction ceremony, followed by a champagne reception, then an elaborate celebratory dinner.

The trumpets sounded to announced the arrival of members of the Council, who took their place at a long table in the front of the room. The inductees were called individually to the members of the council and their career achievements were cited. Pledges were sworn, medals were bestowed and Champagne was sipped. The ceremonial pomponne is a long silver stylized antique Champagne glass.

About The Ordre des Coteaux de Champagne

The Ordre Des Coteaux De Champagne, one of the most notable Champagne fraternities in the world, is driven by celebrating the wines of Champagne and their diversity. Membership of the Ordre is granted exclusively to selected wine experts, professional restaurateurs, sommeliers who have contributed significantly to the commemoration and development of Champagne.

During the mid-17th century a group of aristocrats at the court of Louis the XIVth, namely: Mortemart, Ollonne, Brousse and the satirist Saint-Evremont, founded the Ordre. They were wine connoisseurs and particularly fond champagne from the three “coteaux” (hillsides) Ay, Avenay and Hautvillers. Hence the name given to this association “Ordre des Coteaux”. It disappeared shortly before the revolution. Around1956 a group of “champenois” led by Roger Gaucher and Francois Tatittinger decided to revive the “Ordre des Coteaux”. Taittinger, Laurent-Perrier, and Mumm were among the founding members.

There are three ranks in the Ordre Des Coteaux De Champagne Chevalier, Officier and Chambellan.

 

Websites:

http://www.ordredescoteaux.com/english/index.php

https://www.liz-palmer.com/

https://www.amazon.com/Ultimate-Guide-Champagne-Liz-Palmer/dp/0991894634

Media enquiries:

French and English

Florence Auffret, Communications Specialist

florenceauffret16@gmail.com

Champagne Bar Launch: “Bubble in Paris” at Hilton Arc de Triomphe exclusive with Taittinger Champagne

Hilton Arc de Triomphe Paris has partnered with Taittinger Champagne to create “Bubble in Paris” a Champagne bar that resembles a life-size snow globe – what fun!

The translucent bar was designed by Jean-Hugues de Chatillon, who drew inspiration from the mythical realm of Narnia, to bottle a miniature winter wonderland.

The 16-foot tall dome will house an all-white, central, circular bar, a lounge that can accommodate 35, and is open now through New Year’s Eve.

WHAT TO ORDER: the signature special €25 for a glass of Taittinger Champagne.

Liz Palmer
@champagnehouses

Bouillon Chartier – ZAGAT Paris Restaurant Review … MY STEAK FRITES!

I didn’t waste any time, I just landed in Paris – I dropped off my luggage and headed to the 9th arrondissement to have lunch with Ryan Ebner, a BNP Paribas Analyst. He’s an expat Canadian living and working in France and thoroughly enjoying it. Ryan and I both picked Bouillon Chartier to meet for lunch because of its historical charm, its popularity, great prices and good reviews from my 2010 Zagat Paris Guide (page 67).

This bistro is a perfectly-preserved relic of an old Paris, with glass-globe fixtures, tables jammed together, coat racks high above the tables, and a menu that hasn’t made a single concession to any of the culinary advancements of at least the last three or four decades (so I was told by some frequent dinners).

The specialty for lunch was a 20 €/person combination of Steak Frites with a glass of house red. Just barely after putting our order in the waiter came back at rapid speed with our glasses of wine, baguette and butter. We were impressed. The house red was a basic vin de pays and welcoming.

The steak was delightfully tender and flavorful served with remarkably fresh, crispy frites, and topped off with their secret sauce.

We were very pleased with the overall service and we both felt restored. I definitely would go back again for lunch or dinner to Bouillon Chartier to soak in this old Paris setting as it is one of the last of the bouillons standing.

On to my next venture in Paris …… Shopping? Chocolate? Champagne?