CHAMPAGNE CASTELNAU UNVEILS NEW LOOK

Champagne Castelnau showcased its new branding last week, which aims to appeal to a younger audience, at the UK market launch in London.

The repackaging takes on a much more minimalist look, which is designed to give the house a more contemporary feel.

While the new logo comprises of two linked letter Cs for Champagne Castelnau which is embedded in a black drop motif signifying the ‘bead’ of champagne.

Champagne Castelnau managing director, Pascal Prudhomme, said: “We have to look forward now, and not look back on tradition. We were not sexy before but we had good wine, and only we knew that.

“I think that all over the world the goal is to be successful by making young consumers interested in the brand. But in order for our wines to be tasted we must first be purchased, and to be purchased we have to be seen in the restaurants and wine shops.

“So it was a necessity to make a change to the traditional champagne bottles and be a little bit different.”

Champagne Castelnau has set a target to sell one million bottles by 2020 and two million by 2025.

Prudhomme added: “Celebrating our centenary last year gave us the opportunity to reflect on our journey ahead and I decided to do an internal audit of our brand, which showed great loyalty from our current customers, plus the opportunity to widen our appeal to new customers.”

Veuve Clicquot introduces Extra Brut Extra Old Champagne

Veuve Clicquot recently unveiled Extra Brut Extra Old champagne. This happens to be the brand’s novel low-dosage cuvée and an “exclusive expression of Yellow Label”.

The international launch event for the cuvée was hosted a few weeks ago by cellar master Dominique Demarville, who announced that the new creation is a result of the richness of the wines he used to make the Champagne.

The notion behind the creation of the enriched cuvee was to create a blend dedicated to extra brut, but also to bring out the imminence of reserved wines. Demarville started out with a vision of displaying how reserve wines are aged at Veuve Clicquot and showing how important they are for Yellow Label. He succeeded in creating the special Veuve Clicquot Extra Brut Extra Old which is an unique combination of reserve wines from six different vintages, including – 2010, 2009, 2008, 2006, 1996 and 1988. Further, a dosage of 3 g/l places the blend in the Extra Brut category, which is used for Champagne with 6g/l of sugar or lower.

The blending and maturity cycle for the cuvée takes almost three years in the bottle and another one year to age in Clicquot’s cellars post-disgorgement. This cuvee is limited to a very small production of 30,000 bottles.

The Official #Champagne Experience Day – London

Kendall-Jackson Vintner’s Reserve Chardonnay 2015  – Wine Review

Kendall-Jackson Vintner’s Reserve Chardonnay 2015  
Wine Review

Lush tropical fruit integrated with some citrus notes. These flavors are carried through to the palate with some hints of vanilla spice to round out the long, lingering finish.

Recommended Food Pairings:

White meats, brie, goat cheese, parmesan, butter and cream sauces.

Notes:

America’s #1 selling Chardonnay for 25 years!

90/100
Liz Palmer
March 14 2017

CHAMPAGNE AFFECTED BY CHARDONNAY SHORTAGE

During the London launch last week of Dom Ruinart 2006 and Dom Ruinart Rosé 2004, Ruinart’s Chef de Cave, Frédéric Panaïotis said that supply was now being constrained by the amount of Chardonnay grapes it could source for the house – a specialist in Blanc de Blancs Champagnes.

“Everything is going well but my boss would be happier if we could get more Chardonnay grapes,” he began.

“Chardonnay is still less than 30% of the planted area in Champagne, and the price is not cheap for Chardonnay grapes, while buying vineyards is not easy, so we have to grow slowly: demand is faster than the growth we could have, but we are used to it,” he added.

Frédéric Dufour, the president & CEO of Ruinart, said that the supply of Chardonnay was limiting growth for the house, describing the grape as a “precious raw material” in Champagne.

“The hardest grape to get is Chardonnay, because even if you have Pinot Noir, you need Chardonnay, and Chardonnay is the least planted grape [in Champagne],” he said.

He then commented, “And for great Chardonnay you need chalk, and certain slopes, and the quantities of Chardonnay produced can be tricky – the grape is fragile because it blossoms early; so great Chardonnay is the most challenging to get.”

He also recorded that, despite the shortage, no more Chardonnay is being planted in Champagne, commenting, “Everything that can be planted to make good Chardonnay has been planted.”

Having observed that “everyone is after good Chardonnay,” he stated, “Good Chardonnay is the most precious raw material in Champagne today.”

Of the 34,000 hectares of vineyards in Champagne today, approximately 10,000ha are planted with Chardonnay, an area that has gradually risen almost 30% over the past 20 years.

Chardonnay is the least planted grape in Champagne, with more than 13,000ha devoted to Pinot Noir, and around 11,000ha given over to Meunier.

Ruinart is a specialist in Champagnes made from Chardonnay: Its ‘R’ de Ruinart NV contains a minimum of 40% Chardonnay; its Ruinart Blanc de Blancs is 100% Chardonnay, sourced predominantly from Premier Cru vineyards, while the Ruinart Brut Rosé is typically 45% Chardonnay and 55% Pinot, of which 18% is red wine.

Meanwhile, the prestige cuvée Dom Ruinart is made entirely with Grand Cru Chardonnay, predominantly from the Côte des Blancs (70%) and the remainder from the Montagne de Reims. And the Dom Ruinart Rosé has the same basis as the blanc, to which 15%-20% red wine (Pinot Noir from Verzenay and Verzy) is added.

The suggested retail prices for the current releases from Ruinart are as follows:

Dom Ruinart Blanc 2006 – £140.00

Dom Ruinart Rosé 2004 – £200.00

 

 

Source:  The Drinks Business