CAMPANIA STORIES – A GREAT OPPORTUNITY TO DISCOVER CAPTIVATING WINES AND UNIQUE TERRITORIES – Filippo Magnani

Campi Flegrei – how fire and sea shape the wines

It is not a coincidence that the ancient Romans identified a desertic area Northwest of Naples, Italy as “Hell’s Door” in the vicinity of the active volcano Vesuvio. The lunar region of Campi Flegrei is a breath-
taking place also literally because of the sulfur in the air.

This volcanic region dates back 15,000 years and it is made up of active volcanos, and thermal water springs – where the grey of the local volcanic rocks dominates.

For centuries this has been the main backdrop of legends, like the meeting of Aenea with his father; it was also described as one of the most prodigious places in the world by Goethe. He was not wrong, with its enchanting and scary landscape, Campi Flegrei overlooks the bay of Naples, the island
of Procida, the Cultural Capital and the island of Ischia, famous for its warm water springs.

Fire, water, land and air: these are the main elements of Campi Flegrei – translated as burning fields; a region that is living a renaissance lately, with special thanks to the strong network of the local consortium, producers and tourists taking key roles. July and August 2022, Campi Flegrei registered over 120,000 visitors and an increase of 15% of visitors to the area, producing an income in two months of over 1 million euros.

Campi Flegrei, with its wild beauty, was also the backdrop of the 2022 Campania Stories – Special Edition. This is a yearly wine event for press and trade professionals; an unmissable occasion to taste special vintages, and wines and meet the producers. Diana Cataldo and Massimo Iannaccone, ideators and directors of Campania Stories, did their very best with this event, not only by arranging a comprehensive wine tasting but also, with visits and tours to the producers.

The hosting region of this press trip, Campi Flegrei, is well known for the white grape varietal Falanghina. Campi Flegrei has enjoyed the DOC appellation with the Falanghina grape since 1994, but also, with the red grape varietal Piedirosso or Per’e Palummo. While Falanghina is known for being grown almost only in the Sannio region, needless to say, the grapes from Campi Flegrei are a different clone, a thinned bunch, lighter and with a distinguish saltiness.

The wineries are concentrated in 7 towns, including Naples, which is why, sometimes for this appellation we might talk of “Metropolitan Vineyards”, which are small estates nestled among tall buildings, but still enjoying the sea breeze from the Bay of Naples. Most of them have few pre-phylloxera plants, as the volcanic, powdery soil has preserved the European roots throughout the years.

A common thought is that Falanghina is an easy wine to drink and is to be consumed within a year of harvest, but there was a happy discovery during the blind wine tasting at Campania Stories – we tasted a 10-year-old Falanghina – the colour was deeply darker, the typical saltiness of Campi Flegrei area showed an incomparable crispness of this white.

La Sibilla is one of the milestone wineries of the area, which is based in Bacoli, North of Naples. The Di Meo family has run the wine business for over five generations on an estate of 10 ha. A section of the vineyards grows in an archaeological area called Villa di Cesare. There are a few plants in their vineyards that date back to more than a century, and are still on the European roots, protected by the friable grey volcanic soil. But the gem of La Sibilla is the aging cellar, an ancient tank of tuff where the Romans
collected rainwater. A naturally cool, dark place, where old single vineyard wines from Falanghina and Piedirosso keep aging. The classic Falanghina Campi Flegrei 2021 (we tasted) was straw yellow, with a herbal bouquet recalling all the herbs growing wild in the vineyards, from sage to
mint, with a touch of lemon zest. On the palate, the wine showed agility, freshness and a long-lasting saltiness – this definitely makes Falanghina a good food wine. A lovely pairing to buffalo milk mozzarella.

Another interesting producer is Agnanum, a smaller producer, run by the Moccia’s family. Their vineyards are next to the Astroni crater, which was previously a hunting reserve of the Borbons. This vineyard tried to survive the advance of concrete which is hidden by buildings and was also challenged by hungry foxes that in harvest time are tempted by the sweet juiciness of Falanghina grapes. The Moccia’s restate is in Agnano, next to a motorway- this is one of the most astonishing places in Naples: in the downtown of such a big city, the vineyard of Piedirosso is something so unexpected! So, while Raffaele Moccia is well known for being one of the authors of the Piedirosso revival, the tasting of Falanghina Campi Flegrei 2012 was not disappointing. A 10-year-old Falanghina is a big challenge, with its deep golden brilliant colour and its intense bouquet of ripe yellow fruit but still keeping its minerality (recalling wet sand and seashells}. On the mouth, the roundness and greasy taste is well balanced by the refreshing saltiness that still keeps the wine incredibly alive. A good way to enjoy the breathtaking view of the islands in the bay.

The press tour of Campania continued with a visit to Sannio, on the northern edge of the region. A historical place, where Roman ruins are side by side to modern buildings, where a stunning aqueduct, a masterpiece of architecture, stands in the middle of the plain around Benevento.
Through the years, Benevento has arisen in popularity because of the magic: legends say that it was the homeland of witches who used to reunite around the walnut trees, grown in Sannio. It’s not a coincidence,
that one of the worldwide most famous liqueurs, from this place, is named Strega – it means “witch” in Italian and whose recipe is still a secret.

Later, the big plain between Matese and Taburno mountain was mostly converted to vine and olive growing. These crops have represented the main income of the area for years, especially in the 20th century, when Sannio was sadly considered the tank of bulk wine from the white grape Falanghina, but also, from other grapes such as Barbera, Gglianico, and Piedirosso..

The average style of Falanghina is aromatic, light-bodied, and to be easily drunk in a year. Nowadays, the big surprise is a number of different styles of Falanghina have emerged, from an easy-drinking wine to a more complex wine. You would never have said it before, but this wine is now suitable for long aging. This all came out from a comprehensive tasting of local wines. One of the main producers of the area is Terre Stregate, a historic winery, run by the Iacobucci, family, who for years, have sold their grapes to other producers, and in the nineties started to invest on their own. The new
generation of the family, Filomena and Carlo, have rejuvenated the brand image, the wine line and labels, keeping the high standard of quality in the winemaking process.

Their wine, Svelato, is one of the best-known Falanghinas in Italy, rewarded by several accolades. Svelato Falanghina del Sannio 2021 is a bright straw yellow wine, with a delicate fruity bouquet, that
recalls ripe yellow fruits with a touch of exotic ones, well blended with a herbal finish. The sip is nicely refreshing, mouth-watering, warm but with a long finish. A full-bodied wine, unexpected from a grape that people considered for years a jug wine.

The estate has over 20ha and includes Falanghina and Aglianico, as well as Barbera, Piedirosso, and some olive trees for olive oil. The most interesting red was the Aglianico del Sannio DOC Manent 2019, a deep red, as expected from any Aglianico, which stands out for fruitiness and cleanness. The wine has been aged for almost a year in both steel and oak, which gives it a smoothness and spiciness, a well-balanced wine, good to drink now or to keep for some years.

@campaniastories #campaniastories #specialedition #masterclass #falanghinacampiflegrei #iobevocampano #campiflegrei #pozzuoli #naples #napoli #campania #campaniawine #tasting #winetasting #igerscampania #igerswine #winetime #degustazione #vino #wine #redwine #whitewine #winelover #winelovers #wines #madeinitaly #italianwine #travelling #winetourism #Falanghina #Aglianico #Italianwinelovers #Barbera #Gglianico, #Piedirosso

 

What to expect from Italy’s 2022 vintage – from Alto Adige to Sicily

Italy’s 2022 vintage has needed a great deal of tactical and strategical interventions from its winemakers to reach its peak. Filippo Bartolotta speaks to producers about what can be expected from this year’s crop.

It is that time of the year when the power of grapes to become wine is about to take place – harvest time!

For 8,000 years, mankind has been actively nursing the vine, waiting each year to ignite and assist the transition of the fruit into our beloved vino. Wine is the perfect mirror of the unique relationships among nature, grape varieties and human factors which every region manifests with a strong sense of place or what we know as terroir.

Every year though terroir’s many factors undergo a deep reshuffle due to the behaviour of that particular vintage – and the 2022 vintage in Italy has asked a great deal of tactical and strategical interventions from its winemakers to complete the annual cycle.

Forecasting a vintage is always something of a gamble at the beginning of August as anything can still happen. As I write this article, for example, Italy has started to see both drought-saving rains as well as violent water bombs and hail storms destroying much of the work done till now.

So although is still early, we can draw a pretty accurate picture of what has been happening and attempt a few outcomes.

The winter was quite regular with good annual snowpack levels in the Alpine regions and enough rains across the central and southern regions. Signs of dramatic drought only started to show with the unprecedented heat wave that had already melted the snow by the end of May and an absence of rain for over a hundred days.

But the vine and the wine world always show remarkable levels of resistance, resilience and an effective reaction to critical vintages.

Luckily, the lesson learned by wine producers from the monstrously hot 2003 vintage increased awareness of vine defence systems against heat and agronomical practices were subsequently studied included soil enrichment, foliage protection against transpiration and sun burn, vigorous rootstocks with deeper root systems and state-of-the-art irrigation methods (when allowed by the appellation and when there’s water available!).

But the best way to understand how a vintage and its harvest is going is to ask people on ground.

Alto Adige

Alto Adige was hit by the absence of rain and really high temperatures but its mountain are a secret weapon, “our great ally”, the President of the Consorzio Alto Adige Andreas Kofler says.

“The altitude is offering a high array of thermal excursions beneficial for our vines. We are hoping for a cooler September to retain acidity and freshness. This is a hot vintage with a couple of weeks of anticipation which will result quite interesting for the reds,” he said.

Kellermeister Andrea Moser of Cantina Kaltern noted that drought was managed largely through leaf management, to protect the berries from the sun during veraison to avoid the loss of anthocians, tannins, aromas and acidity. “This way we are getting to a proper phenological and technical maturation,” he said. “Some late July rains helped for a more consistent veraison and, keeping our fingers crossed, we will be harvesting at the beginning of September, a week in advance compared to 2021.”

Cantina Terlano and Cantina Andriano, overlooking each other from the two opposite sides of Val d’Adige reports a similar approach.

Rudi Kofler, head wine maker at both wineries is confident the vine has been reacting pretty well to the heat and he sees an 10 days anticipation. “We have been trimming leaves less than usual to provide coverage against the sun and we have been taking advantage of the investment in drip irrigation Alto Adige has been carrying out for many years now,” he explained. “We see healthy grapes with less yields per hectare. Thanks to the temperature drop of the recent days we are cautiously optimistic, but we still have to wait.”

Trentino

Trentino has seen a slightly different situation, with Anselmo Guerrieri Gonzaga, owner of the beautiful and historical estate of San Leonardo explaining that there was no stress for the vines.

“San Leonardo is set between mounts Baldo and Lessini and this overcasts a refreshing shade for at least four hours every day,” he explained. “This is a paramount factor to retain elegance and freshness in our wines. We are also noticing a very generous crop for an abundant harvest which should kick-off on the 10th of September.”

Anselmo Guarrieri Gonzaga

Harvest is set to start at Cembra, Cantina di Montagna, near Trento next week, where the altitude is as high as 900m above sea level.

Managing director, Ezio Dallagiacoma notes that the high temperatures bought an anticipation of maturation – and a mid-August harvest – in sight. “We are expecting to see wines with a lot of structure but still with the fresh mountain touch,” he said.

Veneto

“The almost absence of rain in winter and spring brought a late bud break and an unusual ten days early flowering of the vines,” Andrea Sartori of Sartori di Verona explains about his vineyard in Valpolicella and Soave.

“The bunches though look pretty healthy and not too compact making the selection of the best berries easier than usual. in the long run we will have to think more seriously about irrigation but so far with a little help of some scattered rains harvest 2022 looks better than expected.”

Talking to Pierangelo Tomassi of Tommasi Family Estates, which has its head quarter in Verona but farms 700 hectares across the length and breadth of Italy (the last harvest takes place in Vulture with the Aglianico) was particularly interesting, as he could provide an overview of the whole of Italy.

“Drought and heat were the common denominators of the year across the country. It was a tough vintage but where we had irrigation, we are getting far better results,” Tommasi said. “The harvest has just started, so we can’t say too much but it looks like we are going to have around 15% less in quantity overall. If the weather doesn’t go crazy this lower quantity should bring some nice wines though.”

Lombardia

Guido Berlucchi, started the harvest on the 3rd of August with the Brolo ‘clos’ of Pinot Nero. Winemaker and owner Arturo Ziliani described it as “a one-of-a-kind harvest with so much heat during the summer that it gave us good healthy grapes, although with possibly lower yields per hectare given the smaller size of the berries.”

Moving south in Oltrepò Pavese, in the Lombardia region – Italy’s most important district of Pinot Noir, with around 3,000 hectares of vines – we talked to two wine makers, Ottavia Giorgi Vistarino and Francesca Seralvo.

Ottavia Vistarino, owner of Conte Vistarino argued that despite the low rain, they didn’t experience too much stress on the vines as the ones on sandier soil. “We have been fighting drought keeping our vineyards with every either vine inter-row soil tillage and very few toppings”, he said.

Meanwhile Francesca Seralvo from Tenuta Mazzolino was unfiltered in her opinion.

Francesca Seralvo

“Hot and dry, it the vintage was worse than 2003!” she exclaimed. “We have been working hard like never before to do anything to keep the vines in balance. I’ve got to be honest that I am actually taken aback by the harmony our vines seem to have found despite the total lack of water. We are going to harvest much less than ever and yet the quality is good. We harvested already our Chardonnay – a tiny production of very juicy fruit.”

Piemonte

It was not an easy season in Piemonte. The winter was colder than in either 2020 or 2021 but it was also very dry with very little snow and the first serious rain fell at the end of May.

Up-and-coming talented wine producer Federica Boffa Pio of Pio Cesare notes that while waiting for the rain to arrive, the team worked the vineyards throughout the winter months in order to get as much nutrition for the soils as possible.

“Later on we protected the berries from the scolding sun and reduced the yields quite a bit which will result in a not very productive vintage,” he says. “Harvest should take place in a week for the whites and the end of September for the Nebbiolo.”

Tuscany

Meanwhile in Tuscany, contingency plans are going well, says Francesco Ricasoli, of Ricasoli in Brolio-Gaiole, Chianti Classico. “Right now we are still experiencing important vineyard stress particularly on the pebble-based soils where the roots do not seem to be able to push deeper in search for water,” he explains. “We had to go for special emergency irrigation for the younger vines.”

Still in Chianti Classico, but in Greve in Chianti on the Florentine side, the François family of Castello di Querceto are very happy about how the whole appellation reacted to the drought.

“The natural cooling system offers by the forest (out of 70,000 hectares of the Chianti Classico appellation only 10% is vineyards) and the good work for the water reservoirs held a lot,” Alessandro François told me. “Our vines are high on the hills and as a result they parents struggling much, but now we do need rain.”

In Castellina in Chianti, Léon Femfert of Nittardi said working the soil in winter and adding spontaneous vegetation as bedding to retain humidity in the soil had “never been more important”.

“So far our crop seems abundant with grapes full of good polyphenols anticipating a great structure Chianti Classico,” he said.

Calogero Portannese managing director of Tenuta di Trinoro in Sarteano, in the heart of Unesco site Val d’Orcia noted that it was fortunate to be between Mount Amiata and Mount Cetona. “This brings 20 degrees thermal excursion between day and night, while the godsend rain at the end of July did the rest,” he said.

Emilia Nardi, owner of Tenute Silvio Nardi in Montalcino has been doing everything possible to reduce the stress for the vines. ”Organic kaolinite (a type of white clay) was used on the leaves to reduce transpiration reflecting light away,” he explains. “We have smaller berries with a good quality so we are expecting less but good”.

Calabria

Not everything about the drought has been bad for the vine though, according to Calabria Librandi. While Paolo Librandi would have loved a little rain to ease the life of the vines and produce a bit more, he seems happy about the healthy conditions of the grapes, which have seen the least amount of treatment ever.

“We are harvesting right now quite a bit in advance. It looks like a good vintage for the quantity with some smaller grapes, more concentration, above all in the red wines. The indigenous white varieties look good with healthy grapes,” he says. “But I have to be honest that a little rain would make everyone happier and give a little more quantity. But given the drought, it is quite impressive the health conditions of the grapes all across the Cirò area with only 3/4 treatments throughout the year!”

Sicily

According to Consorzio Doc Sicilia, Sicily is likely to record almost 15% less production for 2022, than in 2021, but with an amazing quality. The Consorzio’s president Antonio Rallo notes that harvest starts this week and will finish in October, making it the longest harvest in Italy, of over 100 days.

Mount Etna producer Passopisciaro notes that despite more than two and a half months of heat wave with no rain, the vines seem ok.  “We are noticing how our single vineyards Etna DOC hundred years old vines are actually in wonderful state, a little ahead of schedule but possibly very good fruit,” managing director Vincenzo Lo Mauro says.

Resilience

The lack of water over the last few months and the high temperatures have been driving producers a little crazy and many are scared about the future outcomes if vintages continue to be as hot.  However vine growers and the wine-makers seem to be well equipped to face this threat, and in some ways it is remarkable how well the system has performed in the face of this challenge.  Of course production is likely to be smaller overall, with smaller berries and more concentration but this has meant fewer treatments needed to fight any presence of pests or moulds.

However, with harvest only just starting, this is only the beginning of the story of this hot 2022 vintage, we will have to wait until the beginning of November for its conclusion.

Sources:
Filippo Bartolotta
Drinks Business

 

#italianwine #winelovers #italianwinelovers #italy #vintage2022 #wine #vinto #instawine #wine #winenews #wineinfluencer

Garda Wine Stories: Exploring the Territory and Wines of Lake Garda – Filippo Magnani

From the 8th to 11th of June, the Garda DOC Consortium organized ‘Garda Wine Stories’, an event dedicated to the extraordinary peculiarities of the wine territory of Lake Garda. It was a full-scheduled press tour which included: seminars, masterclasses, in-depth analysis, guided cellar tours, and a stunning sailboat ride with tasting, aboard a cutter (equipped with the ancient trapezoidal sails). It was not only an opportunity for the Italian and international press to discuss in-depth the complex and vast territory, but also for wine lovers. On Friday, June 10th we attended a tasting with 20 producers, representing the best winemaking areas. The impeccable event was organized by the Consortium.

Discovering Garda DOC
The denomination Garda DOC was founded in 1996. It represents a large geographical area that groups in the same macro area other important Italian DOCs for a total of around 31,100 hectares under vine, of which 27,889 hectares are in the province of Verona, the outlying hectares are spread between the towns of Mantua and Brescia. Today, it has around 4,000 associated producers and a production of 21 million bottles, with a good prospect of further growth. The objective of the Consortium is to enhance the value of the varietal wines produced in these historical appellations and to give further opportunities of identification for those who grow in the outlying zones. The Consortium is playing an important role in pursuing a circular strategy that conveys all the resources that Lake Garda has, and the dialogue between the wine system, wine tourism and hospitality, sport activities, and gastronomy.

Garda – A Wine Territory around the Lake
Lake Garda is the largest body of water in Italy, extending for about 370 km2, it is encompassed by 3 Italian regions: Lombardy, Veneto, and Trentino Alto Adige. Its banks extend for 50 km from north to south and for about 17 km from east to west. In the imaginary triangle composed of the provinces of Trento (north), Brescia (south-west) and Verona (south-east), an extraordinary natural and cultural heritage is preserved. The landscape, from any point you look, is a jubilation of biodiversity, corners of extraordinary scenic beauty. Mountains, hills, and beaches are covered by the typical Mediterranean vegetation with olive trees, caper bushes, lemon and citron trees, agave plants and vines; all framed by historical and cultural sites, castles, harbours, charming villages, traces of human activities that have always influenced the appearance of Lake Garda shores.

The climate is mild in all its extension despite the northerly longitude. There are many factors that contribute to the incredible climatic conditions that make Lake Garda one of the most heterogeneous and interesting wine areas. The northern cone-shaped narrow area is surrounded by the Alps providing a shield from the cold currents from the North. The lake also plays an important mitigating action, lifting colder fogs in the mornings allowing the ventilation among the vines, and by absorbing heat and releasing it in relation to the external temperature. Winters are never harsh, and summers are hot. The daily temperature range is quite high due to the presence of a breeze blowing south in the morning and north in the afternoon, thermal excursion is an extremely important factor for the perfect ripening of the grapes.

From the gentle morainic hills of the southern basin to the extreme peaks of the Alps, the soil around Lake Garda is a puzzle of different compositions but perhaps the most distinctive and fascinating element has to do with the light. This place is glowing. The phenomenon of light refraction made possible by the size and depth of the lake is an element of great uniqueness in the territory. Here the vine finds a perfect place to grow, in a bright and lush nature, helped by the meticulous hands of brilliant winemakers. The wide area that covers Garda Doc includes countless grape varieties and many interpretations of them.

Each of the wine districts that stretch around Lake Garda bring traditions in production methods, history and, of course, the most representative vines from the different areas: Garganega, Trebbiano (Trebbiano di Soave and/or Trebbiano di Lugana), Chardonnay, Pinot Grigio, Corvina, Marzemino, and Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon. Altogether, they constitute the backbone of Garda DOC wine production. Great importance is given to the sparkling wines using the varieties from the different wine areas: Garganega for white wines, Corvina for rosé, crémant method Chardonnay, but also Pinot Grigio, Reno, and Muller Thurgau.

The boundaries of DOC Garda embrace a wide area. Considering the extraordinary attitude of Italian wine territories to change connotations in a few meters, it’s hard to imagine how many environments coexist around the lake. The Consortium has been stimulating scientific research in order to improve the understanding of the pedoclimatic and oenological aspects of the Lake Garda territory, with the ultimate goal of proposing models with a sustainable footprint to enhance wine productions and to defend our extraordinary natural heritage.

Lake Garda: A Paradise for Wine Enthusiasts
Lake Garda is one of the most romantic locations and it represents the charm of the Dolce Vita Italiana. It is a real paradise for those who love wine, food, stunning natural scenery, sports, art and culture… in short, there is everything for everyone!  It is no coincidence, that the territory around the lake is one of the favorite destinations of lovers of our country (Italy). The road network and the water transport that connect the various areas of the lake allow wine enthusiasts and foodies to concentrate their exploration of the wines of the DOC Garda even on a short holiday.  A journey in a journey, a shining example of how wine tourism became the “art of hospitality”.  The Consorizio Garda DOC is proposed as a promoter of the territory of Lake Garda as a wine escape, collecting and communicating the infinite experiences that can be carried out and proposing them through multiple channels. Visit where official site www.gardadocvino.it  where you learn about amazing stays on these shores, in the section “experience”.

#gardadoc #staywithus #wine #gardalake #italy #italianwineregion #GardaWineStories #LakegardaItaly #italianwinelover #winelover #gastronomy #wine #vino #gardawines #wineexperience #winetasting #winetourism #sailing

Abruzzo Wine Region is in an Exciting Phase of Transformation – Part l

I discovered, during my recent trip to the Abruzzo wine region, that it’s in an “exciting phase of transformation” – there are a higher number of family estates; I see more wineries adopting organic farming; and the winemakers are moving toward terroir-focused wines – which are more complex and have distinctive characteristics of the region.

In the early 1970s through to 1980s, this region was dominated by large co-op wineries. During this period most families sold their grapes directly to the co-ops.

About the Abruzzo Wine Region
Abruzzo is an Italian wine region which is on the East coast of Italy, on the Adriatic Sea. I found the geographical features of Abruzzo to be quite extraordinary. It’s a rugged, mountainous region with an extensive rugged coastline, a landscape of lush green, scattered with national parks and forests. Abruzzo is situated between the Adriatic Sea (to the East), the Apennine Mountain range with the Maiella massif (to the West). Gran Sasso, one of Italy’s highest peaks at 2,912m (9,554 ft) can also be found here.

There is only one DOCG, Montepulciano d’Abruzzo Colline Teramane, and there are three DOCs: Cerasuolo d’Abruzzo and Montepulciano d’Abruzzo, and one white: Trebbiano d’Abruzzo.

The grape varieties include native red Montepulciano and native white Trebbiano. Other native grape varieties include Sangiovese, Passerina, Pecorino and Cococciola. Other international varieties include Chardonnay, Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot.

Please Note: Abruzzo’s signature red grape “Montepulciano de Abruzzo” should not be confused with Vino Nobile de Montepulciano from Tuscany.

Fun Fact: According to local legend the native white grape “Pecorino” was named after the sheep that ate this grape in the vineyards.

According to the Consorzio Vini d’Abruzzo (the Consortium for the Protection of Wines of Abruzzo) this region currently has approximately 250 wineries, 35 co-ops, 34,000 hectares of vineyards – which produces over 1.2 million bottles of wine per year.

Weather
The coast has a Mediterranean climate – abundant sunshine, with average rainfall of 26 inches per year, followed by cold winters. Inland has more of a continental climate. with snow in the winter. In the high altitudes there are measurable diurnal temperature variations, combined with cool mountain air currents. There are also moderate temperatures on the slope-vineyards, which provides a mesoclimate for the vines.

Abruzzo Viticulture – Vine Training
80% of the vines are Abruzzo-pergola training system which was designed to shade bunches and to make harvest less arduous. The remaining 20%, which are mainly new plantings, have planted in rows with spurred cordon, free cordon, GDC.

Interesting Facts

  • Winemaking traditions in Abruzzo date back to the sixth century BC due to the Etruscans, who played a major role in introducing viniculture to the area.
  • There is also evidence that vine-growing goes back further, as far as the fourth century BC, when sweet, Moscato-style grape “Apianae” was grown. It is also believed that when Hannibal made his epic journey over the Alps, his soldiers were given Abruzzo wine from Teramo, previously known as Pretuzi.
  • In terms of quantitative wine production, Abruzzo is Italy’s fifth most notable wine region followed by Sicily, Puglia, Veneto and Emilia-Romagna.

Located a scenic two-hour drive east from Rome, the Abruzzo wine region marries centuries of tradition with modern style. Cin-cin!

Stay tuned for Part ll – Abruzzo Wine Region is in an Exciting Phase of Transformation, where I will do a deep dive into some of the estates.

#vinidabruzzo #abruzzowines #abruzzo #abruzzoitaly #abruzzowine #wine #winelover  #winetravel #winetourism #womeninwine #wineexperience #winetravels #winetasting #wineinfluencer #wineadventures #winenews #instawine #italianwines #vin #abruzzowines #vinidabruzzo #abruzzolovers #abruzzo #abruzzodocpecorino #montepulcianodabruzzo #trebbianodabruzzo
#abruzzodoc #cerasuolodabruzzo #italianwinelovers

The Trabocchi Coast – Abruzzo

I’m just back from Abruzzo, Italy – It’s a fascinating region of majestic mountains, national parks, stunning seascapes, charming villages, breathtaking views, and exceptional wines.

The coast of Abruzzo ranges from flat golden sandy beaches to dramatic coastlines with high cliffs to pebble beaches, which is on the Adriatic Sea.  The water temperature can reach 28 degrees in the summer. I was told by the local lifeguards that you can swim starting in April to the first week of October.  It’s interesting to note that Abruzzo has one of the highest densities of “blue flag” beaches in Italy!

What I found fascinating is the “Trabocchi Coast” a UNESCO World Heritage-protected for its traditional wooden fishing structures “Trabocchi.” This stunning 70-kilometer coast goes from Ortona to San Salvo (Chieti) and is a beautiful drive where you can see the striking collection of these stilt wooden huts. Some have been left abandoned, which make them more mystical, and some have been turned into restaurants.

Trabocchi were constructed by local fishermen in the 18th Century and were simply an extension of the rocky coastline. In order to facilitate fishing, boards were placed on the submerged rocks on the beaches so the fishermen could fish further offshore. Gradually, wooden stilts were used to erect freestanding platforms, which allowed the fishermen to project further out into the sea and were connected to land by long narrow boardwalks. The local fisherman fished for for anchovies, sardines, sea bream and sea bass.

The Trabocchi have been described as “colossal spiders” and “machines that seemed to live their own lives”  Gabriele D’Annunzio.

After speaking to locals, I found out that some of the Trabocchi are a few centuries old and still belong to fishing families.

It truly was an amazing experience .. walking along the boardwalk suspended above the sea, the smell of algae and crashing waves over the rocks – the atmosphere is both magical and romantic.

Having dinner on the Trabocchi we ate fresh fish and drank local white wines Pecorino and Trebbiano d’Abruzzo – an unforgettable evening with amazing views!

The “Trabocchi Experience” is a must when you visit Abruzzo!

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