MILLÉSIME BIO 2020 – Pérols, France

International wine Journalists, winemakers, wine marketers, and researchers will head to the south of France January 27-29 2020 for the only trade show dedicated to organic wine.

With green issues and climate change increasingly at the forefront of consumers’ purchasing choices, the importance of organic and biodynamic viticulture has never been more evident. This makes Millésime Bio more relatable than ever.

The 2020 event will introduce the addition of beer and cider makers and is set to be the trade show’s largest event ever. The organizers have increased the space to accommodate the increased number of wineries and businesses delving into the world of organics. Therefore, a fifth hall has been opened to house a further 100 exhibitors.

For 2020 Millésime Bio will take place over three days from 27 to 29 January 2020 at the Montpellier Exhibition Centre in Pérols.

There will be a free-pour area fitted with enotecas that will offer guests the chance to taste wines that have won medals in the annual international Millésime Bio competition. The Challenge Millésime Bio is one of the world’s largest organic wine competitions, which includes a judging panel made up of wine experts and senior buyers, chaired by Jean-Luc Rabanel, the head chef of the two-Michelin-starred restaurant l’Atelier in Arles and founder of the ‘Greenstronomie’ movement.

The fair will also run masterclasses and seminars, with particular attention to organic winemaking, but also changing trends and issues affecting the wider wine trade, including business and marketing.

“It’s safe to say our fair is in very good shape and continues to gather momentum,” Patrick Guiraud, president of Millésime Bio, said.

“This year, we wanted to offer the opportunity for more exhibitors to take part. They’ve been quick to secure their stands and we’ve even had to open a waiting list in September.”

Event Details:

The opening party, organized by SudVinBio, will take place on Monday 27 January.
27 January 2020 from 10am to 7pm
28 January 2020 from 9am to 7pm
29 January 2020 from 9am to 5pm

Address:
Montpellier Exhibition Centre (Parc des Expositions de Montpellier), Route de la Foire, 34470 Pérols, France

Website:
https://www.millesime-bio.com/en

Cotes de Provence AOC reveals fifth DGC region

Cotes de Provence AOC now has a fifth terroir designation (DGC), as revealed by the Conseil Interprofessionel des Vins de Provence (CIVP). The designation was officially recognized by a decree published in the “Official Journal” of 10 August 2019, based on a recommendation from the National Committee of the INAO (French Institute of Origin and Quality).

Côtes de Provence Notre-Dame des Anges is the fifth terroir designation under the Côtes de Provence AOC (following in the footsteps of Sainte-Victoire, Fréjus, La Londe and Pierrefeu). Its name refers to the highest peak in the Massif des Maures mountain range, visible from all the communities in the terroir. Recognition of this terroir designation entails the application of more restrictive production rules for red and rosé wines, laid down in specifications approved by the INAO and namely including plot-based selection, choice of varietals, lower yields, and wine-making methods.

The terroir covers 10 communities and 3,900 hectares of grapevines within the landscape of umbrella pines, oak trees and chestnut groves forming the Plaine des Maures National Nature Reserve.

The 2019 production numbers are expected to be between 3,500 and 4,000 hectolitres. As per the specifications, the roses will be released to the market on December 15, 2019; and the reds on September 1, 2020.

The harvest for the area is now underway the 2019 vintage will be the first for the Cotes de Provence Notre-Dame des Anges.

President of the Notre-Dame des Anges Section of the Cotes de Provence, Jean-Pierre Daziano, said: “After 15 years of comparative tastings, plot identification and the development of control batches, we have been able to bring the Notre-Dame des Anges terroir designation project to fruition, because the wine-makers all shared a common goal, based on a belief in the typicality of their wines. This area boasts special natural features, but it is also a terroir in the oenological sense of the term because the way the producers work the land is reflected in the characteristics of the wines.”

Eric Pastorino, president of the Cotes de Provence Syndicate, said: “For many years now, the Syndicat des Vins Cotes de Provence has been engaged in the promotion of its terroir through the identification of specific geographic sectors, an approach which has resulted in the recognition of five terroir designations in conjunction with local wine-makers. This strategy is part of a process to upgrade the appellation, with the aim of producing wines which are recognized for their quality and for the expression of their terroir.”

Italy is named the world’s best wine country

Italy has been ranked as the best country in the world for wine lovers in a recent survey by Lastminute.com.

The survey compared thirty wine-producing countries by various criteria with Italy finishing with the highest score. It beat out other counties due to the fact that it offers the most wine tasting experiences; with 993 overall to choose from, and Italy has a total of 21 wine regions.

But how did Italy top France?

In three instances:

1. The number of wine tasting experiences – Italy 993 vs. France 406;
2. Italy has more vineyards open to the public – Italy 33 vs. France 31; and
3. The average price of a bottle of wine is less in Italy – €4.77 vs. €5.73 in France.

For the record, France came second, Spain third, South Africa fourth, Portugal fifth, while Australia came in 15th place, Canada 24th, and the US at 27th. The UK, which is fast making a name for itself for the quality of its sparkling wines, came in 30th place on the list.

https://www.lastminute.com/en/discover/wine-lovers-travel-index

Mirazur named world’s best restaurant

Mauro Colagreco’s Mirazur, a French Riviera restaurant with a backyard farm, has been named the World’s Best Restaurant. This is the first time a French restaurant has ascended to the top of the rankings since 2002. Mirazur, located right by the border with Italy, is known for its salted beetroot with caviar cream, and for its unparalleled views of the Cote D’Azur.

“This recognition from my esteemed colleagues and peers is a great honor. It recognizes the trajectory of my life from Argentina to the Riviera that welcomed me so warmly 19 years ago. I am overjoyed to bring this award back to France”, said Colagreco.

“I am from so many influences but above everything, I am a cook and I love to cook. My food is from my heart and I love to share it with my guests. From all of us at Mirazur, thank you – we are all celebrating tonight,” he added.

The votes were submitted by over 1,000 food writers, critics, chefs, restaurateurs and industry experts from 26 regions from around the world.

Colagreco creates modern, delicately flavored dishes made with local seasonal ingredients.
Mauro Colagreco grows much of the produce on his own farm and sources a lot of his ingredients from the nearby Ventimiglia market, making a hero of both seafood and vegetables. One of his signature dishes is oyster with tapioca, shallot cream and pear.
“I am proud to be one of the representatives of a new French kitchen that lives to the rhythm of all the influences of the world. I am not French, but I have made French cuisine my passion; it is so beautiful and so refined.

“I believe in mixing, combining and celebrating all influences. I am pleased to be able to open my kitchen to different inspirations,” he said.

Mauro Colagreco cut his culinary teeth in Buenos Aires, moving to France in 2000 to work at the Lycée Hôtelier de La Rochelle. A year later his big break arrived when he worked as an apprentice under Bernard Loiseau at Cote d’Or. He then went on to work with some of the biggest names in French cooking, including Guy Martin, Alain Passard and Alain Ducasse.
Branching out in 2006, he opened Mirazur in the grounds of a 1930s villa surrounded by orchards and gardens close to the French-Italian border. The restaurant received its first Michelin star less than a year after opening and now boasts the top accolade of three stars.

Here is the official list of the “World’s 50 Best Restaurants 2019” which were announced last night in Singapore:

1. Mirazur (Menton, France)
Chef: Mauro Colagreco
Last year’s rank: 3
Average cost: €110-€210

2. Noma (Copenhagen, Denmark)
Chef: Rene Redzepi
Last year’s rank: N/A
Average cost: 2,500 DKK

3. Asador Etxebarri (Atxondo, Spain)
Chef: Victor Arguinzoniz
Last year’s rank: 10
Average cost: €176 tasting

4. Gaggan (Bangkok, Thailand)
Chef: Gaggan Anand
Last year’s rank: 5
Average cost: THB 6,500

5. Geranium (Copenhagen, Denmark)

6. Central (Lima, Peru)

7. Mugaritz (San Sebastian, Spain)

8. Arpège (Paris, France)

9. Disfrutar (Barcelona, Spain)

10. Maido (Lima, Peru)

11. Den (Tokyo, Japan)

12. Pujol (Mexico City, Mexico)

13. White Rabbit (Moscow, Russia)

14. Azurmendi (Larrabetzu, Spain)

15. Septime (Paris, France)

16. Alain Ducasse au Plaza Athénée (Paris, France)

17. Steirereck (Vienna, Austria)

18. Odette (Singapore)

19. Twins Garden (Moscow, Russia)

20. Tickets (Barcelona, Spain)

21. Frantzén (Stockholm, Sweden)

22. Narisawa (Tokyo, Japan)

23. Cosme (New York City, USA)

24. Quintonil (Mexico City, Mexico)

25. Alléno Paris au Pavillon Ledoyen (Paris, France)

26. Boragó (Santiago, Chile)

27. The Clove Club (London, United Kingdom)

28. Blue Hill at Stone Barns (Pocantico Hills, USA)

29. Piazza Duomo (Alba, Italy)

30. Elkano (Getaria, Spain)

31. Le Calandre (Rubano, Italy)

32. Nerua (Bilbao, Spain)

33. Lyle’s (London, United Kingdom)

34. Don Julio (Buenos Aires, Argentina)

35. Atelier Crenn (San Francisco, USA)

36. Le Bernardin (New York City, USA)

37. Alinea (Chicago, USA)

38. Hiša Franko (Kobarid, Slovenia)

39. A Casa do Porco (São Paulo, Brazil)

40. Restaurant Tim Raue (Berlin, Germany)

41. The Chairman (Hong Kong)

42. Belcanto (Lisbon, Portugal)

43. Hof Van Cleve (Kruishoutem, Belgium)

44. Test Kitchen (Cape Town, South Africa)

45. Sühring (Bangkok, Thailand)

46. De Librije (Zwolle, Netherlands)

47. Benu (San Francisco, USA)

48. Ultraviolet by Paul Pairet (Shanghai, China)

49. Leo (Bogotá, Colombia)

50. Schloss Schauenstein (Fürstenau, Switzerland)

Emmanuel Macron Opens Presidential Wine Cellar to Public

France’s Elysée Palace has officially opened its doors to its wine cellar first time

France’s Elysée Palace has officially opened its doors to its wine cellar first time this past weekend as part of a bid by President Emmanuel Macron to promote national heritage.

There were 350 members of the public who toured the cavernous cellar which houses 14,000 bottles, from all the wine growing regions of France.

“This is the first time we’ve opened the cellar to the public,” Virginie Routis, the Elysée’s sommelier for the past 11 years, told Europe 1 radio.

The three-meter high vaulted cellar is two floors below ground level and keeps a plethora of fine wines and spirits, from cognac to top champagnes, at an ideal temperature of 13 degrees Celsius.

The also cellar contains prestigious vintages such as Cheval Blanc, Latour, and Puligny-Montrachet. Its oldest bottle is said to be a 1906 Sauternes.

“The wine is chosen according to the menu. I make a selection…Madame and Monsieur Macron also get to approve the choice. We really have to represent French gastronomy, so you have to choose wines that speak to a given foreign delegation,” she said.

The cellar was designed in 1947. During Jacques Chirac’s presidency in 2013, some 1,200 bottles were auctioned off as the quantities were too small to serve at official dinners.

Unlike his teetotal predecessor Nicolas Sarkozy, Mr. Macron is quite knowledgeable on French wines and has confessed to drinking a glass of wine at lunch and dinner.

He has chosen to open the cellars as part of France’s annual Heritage Days, where numerous state and listed buildings are exceptionally opened to the public.