What’s in a name? The Bourgogne family explains…

In 2012, on the request of its elected representatives, the Bourgogne Wine Board (BIVB) decided to stop translating the word “Bourgogne”, whatever the country. The aim is to help consumers find their way by ensuring coherence between our wine labels and the name of the region where the wines were created.

Bourgogne wines enjoy a strong global reputation with half of all Bourgogne wines produced being sold at export to around 170 territories. However, the farther the consumer lives from France, the more they struggle to understand our appellation system. They can get their bearings thanks to the wine’s origins, which is the name of this winegrowing region. It is therefore essential to use only one powerful name, a synonym for excellence and the respect for origins: Bourgogne.

Historically, Bourgogne is the only wine-producing region in France whose name is translated into different languages: “Burgundy” for English speakers, “Burgund” for Germans, “Borgogna” in Italian, to name but a few. This dates back to ancient times when the region was established as a crossroads for trade between the north and south and the east and west of Europe, as it still is today.

As such, Bourgogne wine producers and fans find themselves caught up in something of a paradox. The 200 million bottles of Bourgogne wine sold every year have the word “Bourgogne” on their label, either due to their appellation, which might be Bourgogne, Crémant de Bourgogne, Bourgogne Aligoté, and so on, or because they are a “Vin de Bourgogne” or a “Grand Vin de Bourgogne”. But consumers can find them amongst a range referred to Burgundy, Burgund, or Borgogna… Confusing, to say the least.

 

“We felt it necessary to return to our original name, Bourgogne, in order to affirm our true identity, in a unified and collective way,” explains François Labet, President of the BIVB. “I’d say that our appellations are like our forenames, which makes Bourgogne our family name. A name that unites us all with our shared values embracing all the diversity of our wines. You don’t translate a family name!”

 

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IWSC: Top Biodynamic Wines

Biodynamic wines have made their mark at this year’s IWSC. One of the finest is Riesling Sélection de Grains Nobles 2017 from Domaine Albert Hertz in Alsace, France. Scoring 96/100 pts, the judges loved its aromas of honey, ginger and butterscotch, as well as its “firework display of fresh acidity”.

Another first-rate performer was Fattoria La Vialla from Tuscany, Italy, which scored 93/100 pts for its Occhio Di Pernice 2012 Riserva, impressing with its “superb intensity of red cherries and salted-caramel character”…article continues ..https://www.iwsc.net/news/wine/top-biodynamic-wines

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Just in time for summer – Kendall-Jackson launches a low-calorie chardonnay

Kendall-Jackson is launching a lower calorie variant to tap into the ‘lighter wines’ category in the US.

Starting in May this new offer will be under the Kendall-Jackson brand.  Did you know that Kendall-Jackson Vintner’s Reserve Chardonnay has been the most popular Chardonnay in the US for over 26 years?

This low-calorie chardonnay will be called “Avant” is only 85 calories, has no sugar, and has 3 grams of carbs per serving” according to the producer.

This new low-cal wine contains 23% fewer calories than the standard Kendall-Jackson Chardonnay, based on a 150ml serving of wine at 14% abv, which contains 111 calories.

Kendall-Jackson winemaker Randy Ullom explains, “An initial harvest of grapes picked on the earlier side ensures lower sugar. A secondary harvest later in the season offers more complexity and concentration, which complements the wine, producing a full-bodied blend that’s structurally balanced and delicious, yet lower in alcohol and calories.”

Like the Vintner’s Reserve, the Avant Chardonnay is aged in oak barrels to bring a touch of vanilla to the wine, which is described as tasting of “grapefruit, pineapple, creamy lemon meringue and delicate white flowers”.

The 9% Chardonnay is also vegan-friendly and comes with an RRP in the US of $17.

Jackson Family Wines highlighted the commercial potential for this new wine by noting that the ‘lighter wines’ category had grown by 90% in the US in 2020.

Results of the “First Rosé Selection” by Concours Mondial de Bruxelles

The results of the first Rosé Selection by Concours Mondial de Bruxelles were released last week. The high number of entries for this first-time event proves its relevance for both producers and consumers.

Over 1,000 rosés were tasted in ‘lockdown’ and in full compliance with safety measures. The organizers hosted the four days of tastings with irreproachable professionalism. Strict safety measures were ensured throughout, from the lay-out of the tables to serving the wines and disinfecting the equipment.

In addition to the silver, gold and grand gold medals, the competition also awarded ‘revelation’ trophies to rosés that scored the highest in their category.

2021 Vinolok Revelation (Best competing rosé): La Madrague, Cuvée Charlotte / Côtes de Provence, France

2021 Medium-Dry Rosé Revelation: Vinia Traian, Cabernet Sauvignon / Cahul, Republic of Moldova

2021 Fortified Wine Revelation: Domaine du Chêne, Rosé / Pineau des Charentes, France

2021 Sparkling Wine Revelation: Matisak, Méthode Traditionelle Rosé Dry / Sekt, Slovakia

2021 Spanish Wine Revelation: Jaume Serra, Pinot Noir Cuvée Especial 2016 / Cava, Espagne

2021 Portuguese Wine Revelation: Sogrape, Inspirações Rosé / Bairrada, Portugal

2021 Italian Wine Revelation: Cantina Terzini, Rosato / Cerasuolo d’Abruzzo, Italy

Traditionally, rosé has been popular in spring and summer – this has changed. Rosé consumption year-round has gained traction in many countries across the globe, for numerous reasons: Rosé is fresh, accessible and multi-faceted; It lends itself to many different occasions, from the aperitif to al fresco drinking and mealtimes; It can partner with an extensive range of cuisines, particularly global cuisine, which is also extremely popular at the moment, including sushi to spicy foods and tomato sauce-based dishes.

View all the results here: https://concoursmondial.com/en/results/

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Gérard Bertrand Launches Organic Orange Wine “Orange Gold”

Languedoc producer Gérard Bertrand has launched his first organic orange wine, which aims to blend Georgian tradition with a southern French modern twist.

Orange Gold 2020 is Gérard Bertrand’s first orange wine called “Orange Gold.” The wine is made from a blend of Chardonnay, Grenache Blanc, Viognier, Marsanne, Mauzac and Muscat.

Bertrand was inspired to create a modern, fresher expression that respected Georgian traditions.

Chosen for their aromatic complexity, the six grapes used to make the wine are fermented in whole bunches on their skins to add colour and tannin to the wine.

According to Bertrand, Orange Gold has “an unusual profile and remarkable finesse and subtlety, reflecting the vibrancy, minerality and freshness of the south of France.”

The aromas you will find in the wine are white flowers, candied fruit, grapefruit, orange water and white pepper. Bertrand is very proud of the wine’s “light bitterness” on the finish, which he believes “whets” the appetite.

“Orange Gold was bottled a week ago and I’m very proud of it. I’ve tried a lot of different orange wines from around the world, some of which I enjoyed, others I was disappointed by,” Bertrand said.

“I wanted to create an orange wine that blended the tradition of the Georgians with the modernity of the South of France, so it sees oak and stainless steel.”

Bertrand believes the wine offers a new taste experience and pairs well with hard cheeses and spicy dishes. Orange Gold 2020 is on sale via the Gérard Bertrand website priced at €12.50 a bottle.

“Human beings have forgotten that nature has given us the chance to be here. We feel like we’re the king of the world now, which is not true. We created the brand to put nature first again, which is what we need to do,” Bertrand said.