SYMPOSIUM ‘ACT FOR CHANGE’ ENDS ON A COLLABORATIVE NOTE

Organized by Vinexposium June 20 and 21, 2022 at the Cité du Vin, the Symposium ‘Act for Change’ gathered over 35 international experts representing 17 nationalities for a series of discussions focusing on the future of wines and spirits between now and 2030.

The event, which was held as part of Bordeaux Wine Week, ended on an optimistic note after addressing the main issues affecting the wine and spirits industry. These include changing consumer patterns, the consequences of climate change and their impact on the production and distribution of wine and spirits. Each talk addressed these issues and provided practical insight, both for industry members attending and those who joined the livestream on Vinexposium Connect, the group’s digital portal. Nine major themes were explored by industry players who view the future with pragmatism, ambition, and confidence in a world of experimentation and solutions to cope with the many challenges to come. At the close of the symposium, speakers agreed that the future of the wine industry would be collaborative, innovative and technological, where ethical practices, transparency, knowledge sharing and engagement between the large companies and winegrowers would be promoted.

Here are some observations on the panel discussions and talks:

If fine wines are to have a future, it will be close to nature

Questioned about the future of fine wines, Oliver Bernard shared his views about the changes awaiting the industry. Expressing a mix of enthusiasm and realism, the director of Domaine de Chevalier stressed the importance of reacting immediately to environmental issues, whilst reiterating his confidence in consumers and future generations in celebrating fine wines. Solutions he mentioned included the emergence of new grape varieties for appellation wines, support for estates to switch over to organic and biodynamic winegrowing and adapting vineyard management techniques.

New consumer habits and new sensory profiles

Questioned about flavour and aroma profiles in 2030, Cathy Van Zyl MW, deputy editor of Platter’s South African wine guide, stated that the South African market was in the process of transitioning to lighter wines. Whisky consultant Colin Hampden-White responded by sharing insight into changing spirits styles, which are increasingly flavourful in response to consumer expectations. Pierre Mansour, wine purchasing director for The Wine Society, stressed that 65% of consumers prioritise climate issues in their choice of wines. Many consumers are looking primarily for ‘honest wines’, showing authenticity, viewed as pure site-expressiveness. Honest wines now seem to be establishing themselves as an emerging and growing trend among consumers seeking added value. They are also asking for variety of choice, catering to their own personal consumption habits, and are turning increasingly towards wines that are drier, more unrefined in style, yet remain savoury, and also towards those that pin their environmental credentials to the mast. For spirits, the future is all about creativity, diversity, assertive tastes, and local traceability. New consumers want to be surprised, they are looking for originality and unexpected styles, which can stem either from new distillation techniques or from creative recipes with unfamiliar ingredients. Stéphanie Marchand-Marion, a lecturer at Bordeaux University studies the latest changes in flavour trends, from the consumer perspective and in terms of climate change. She concluded that wines could survive tomorrow’s climate challenges, provided a balance in their composition was found. 

Tomorrow’s packaging – where changing consumer patterns, innovation and lower CO2 emissions converge

The challenge for the packaging of the future will be to respond to the divergence between the unquestionable need to reduce the carbon footprint stemming from the manufacturing process and consumer perception of sustainable, environmentally friendly packaging. In the consumer psyche, glass remains a sustainable vessel, whereas the reality is more complex. The results of steps taken to recycle bottles are not significant, providing evidence of the discrepancy between interest shown for ecological issues and a real desire by consumers to change their habits. Lulie Halstaed, Director of Wine Intelligence – IWSR, has noticed this particularly in Australia, where 67% of wine and spirits buyers believe in climate change, but only 21% claim to act responsibly. Rob Malin, the founder of When in Rome, launched the first wine sold in a paper bottle, which emits 6 times less CO2 than a glass bottle. As a reminder, the production of glass accounts for nearly 40% of the industry’s CO2 emissions.

Tomorrow’s packaging will have two roles to play: research work and the move towards more sustainable packaging will need to continue, and bottles must be used as a tool for educating consumers of wine and spirits, which are among the most highly packaged products around.

Digitalization of Wine and Spirits

Cyril Grira, Retail & Omnichannel director at Google France, has seen an acceleration in searches for wines and spirits on the Google search engine, as with ‘organic wines’ that have increased three-fold. He also points to the fact that most consumer searches focus on grape varieties, appellations, and local productions. Yet, lack of consumer knowledge on the topic (80% of searches are generic) and of visibility for small producers are barriers to industry performance. The wine industry would benefit from taking a leaf out of the fashion and beauty industries’ book, where multiple formats are used to innovate and tell stories. At the same time, the online sales outlet must connect better with the physical sales outlet. As regards the metaverse, experts expressed reservations, stressing that wine and spirits are primarily part of real-life experiences.

Winegrowing and climate change: opportunities in the face of adversity
As climate change causes upheavals, techniques and typicities across the wine regions are evolving. During the symposium, it was unanimously agreed that coping with climate change and human resilience in supporting winegrowing would be pivotal to tackling the issue. Varietal diversification, planting grape varieties in suitable locations, rootstock and balanced management were all cited as resources. Viewing the future with optimism and ambition, participants called on the industry to take leadership of climate issues and underscored the significance of a collaborative approach – one of the biggest challenges is to think collectively, as a community, so that existing solutions can be shared more effectively.

Geopolitics, wines and spirits – lessons to be learnt from crises

The war in Ukraine undermines control of global capitalism, with consequences including the risk of entering a recession and the supremacy of the dollar in international trade. A new global geo-economy is in the making. Faced with this changing situation, the ability of wine and spirits businesses to adapt must enable them to grasp new export opportunities, in regions such as Africa for instance, and strengthen their brands and their image. Compliance with local rules and protection of brands and appellations are also drivers of this success. Similarly, the impact of climate change affects the geopolitics of wine and spirits, both in the positions taken by leaders and the viability of a supply chain designed to respond to the ‘just-in-time’ logistics expected by younger generations. As Christophe Navarre, chairman of the board of Vinexposium pointed out, “The impact of climate change on winegrowing will be huge. This is a priority mission for businesses, the choice is no longer ours”.

Agro-ecology and innovation: essential bedfellows

Faced with climate challenges and the need to remain competitive in a constantly changing marketplace, agro-ecology innovations are the future. They already come in a variety of forms, from the open access ‘calculator’ for measuring carbon footprint, use of artificial intelligence for managing farms and optimising aspects such as yields – including solutions provided by Israeli company Trellis – to the introduction of regenerative techniques. Although the latter concept covers a whole galaxy of realities, relevant regulations are rapidly progressing and influencing – sometimes even restricting – winegrowing practices. From high-tech solutions to a return to basics, agro-ecology is reinventing itself at the instigation of stakeholders who aim to make it accessible to the broadest audience.

How e-commerce has upended the relationship with the consumer

Lockdown expedited online buying and revolutionised sales. Fabrice Bernard, president of Millesima, commented on how the internet piqued consumer interest about wines that they usually did not drink. E-commerce has changed buying habits, but without driving customers away from shops. This development is compelling e-commerce players to rethink the way they work by creating new technology tools such as those provided by Preferabli, which uses digital technology to help consumers make choices. “We will witness consolidation in the marketplace, but the biggest change over the next ten years will be the increasing number of businesses focusing on the customer rather than on the product. Shops are not the only place where customers can have physical interactions. Digital technology will allow the magic surrounding the product’s story to be developed faster and technology can help tell these stories”, claimed Pam Dillon, co-founder and CEO of Preferabli. The future of e-commerce seems to mesh with a competitive marketplace where customer service will make all the difference.

The future of wine and spirits in 2030 – wrapping up 

The near future will require adjustments to cope with current changes, yet also continued pragmatism, concluded Christophe Navarre, chairman of the board of Vinexposium, who stressed the positive pressure from young people for immediate action in favour of the climate. “Rolling out large-scale, practical actions involves reconciling political agendas, corporate activities, and consumer patterns. This is a complex process. For example, in supermarkets, producers who take positive action are not promoted enough. There is no doubt that this is now one of our missions”, he also pointed out in his concluding remarks at the Symposium ‘Act for Change’.

#actforchange #bordeaux #thesymposium #sustainability #winetrends #winenews #winetrade #vinexposium #CitéduVin #wine #winelovers #winetech #wineconference #wineindustry #wineeducation #wineconsumers #winemarketing #bordeauxwineweek @laciteduvin @vinexposium

Winechain (wiNeFT) Partners with CMA CGM Group for Logistics of Fine Wines 

Winechain the NFT platform (wiNeFT /Winechain NFT name) designed to create direct links to new generations of wine consumers around the world, has today announced the partnership with the CMA CGM Group. This global player in sea, land, and air logistics solutions will take a minority shareholding in Winechain alongside its founders.

Winechain is the fi­rst independent NFT platform for ­fine wine estates. This wine-meets-technology project has been designed to create direct links with new generations of wine consumers around the world has now raised over €1 million in backing from top international wine estates and others.

The initiative was launched in April 2022 by three Frenchmen: Xavier Garambois, former head of Amazon Europe, Guillaume Jourdan, CEO of VitaBella, Paris, and Nicolas Mendiharat, CEO of the San Francisco Palate Club.  The plan is to go live by the end of 2022 with the issue of the ­first wiNeFT (Winechain name NFT).

Xavier Garambois, joint founder of Winechain states:

“Although the acquisition of NFTs will be the first thing that enthused buyers will do on Winechain, the day will come when the owner of the wines will want to have them shipped to their homes, wherever that might be in the world, and in the very best conditions. Apart from enabling access to rare wines, Winechain also takes care of logistics to ensure that the wines arrive at their final destination in perfect condition. This worldwide partnership with the CMA CGA Group is a mark of confidence in the future and our strategy that enables us to look to the long term. We will be able to benefit from the expertise and experience of CMA CGA and the major support that they can bring in terms of sea and air transport and logistical services.”

 

#winetrade #winedelivery #winelogistics #logistics #NFT #winechain #winemarketing #nfts #nftcommunity #wine #finewine #winelovers #winecollectors #wineinvestors #nftcollector #winenews #wineindustry #winetech #winetrends #winetechnology

Chile officially launches Organic Wine Association “COW”

Chile officially launches Organic Wine Association “COW” Chile has unveiled its first association for certified organic wine producers, and it’s been given a distinctive and memorable acronym “COW”. COW stands for Chilean Organic Winegrowers, and unites eight producers, who are also members of Vinos de Chile.

Last week the organization was officially launched at ProWein, with founding members: Emiliana, Cono Sur, Koyle, Matetic, Miguel Torres Chile, Odfjell, Veramonte and De Martino.

COW comes with the support of Vinos de Chile, which will help the organic wine association through the bigger organization’s R&D facility, legal teams and human resources.

The new group has been created to help promote Chilean organic wines, and to also raise awareness and the benefits of organic approaches to grape growing.

According to COW, sales of organic wines increased by more than 20% in 2021 for the founding wineries, with demand being driven by Canada, the US, the Nordics and Japan.

#wine #winelovers #winenews #winetrends #COW #ChileanOrganicWinegrowers #organicwine #chileanwine #chileanwinelovers #vinos #VinosdeChile #chile #winesofchile #vino

Anteprima Vino Nobile di Montepulciano 2022 – an immersive experience in one of the most ancient red wine zones of Tuscany – Filippo Magnani

The unmissable preview of “Vino Nobile di Montepulciano” was held inside the Fortress of Montepulciano at the end of March in the centre of the medieval town. The doors were officially reopened to the public. For the first day of the event, wine journalists and Trade from the Montepulciano area had the opportunity to not only taste the wines, but to also meet the producers behind these beloved productions of refined quality. Two main vintages were presented:  Nobile di Montepulciano 2019, considered a great vintage, and the Nobile di Montepulciano Riserva 2018.

The Consorzio of Nobile di Montepulciano had previously introduced a variation to the chart of regulations last year introducing 12 Unità Geografiche Aggiuntive called “Pievi .” The name conceals the roots of the past of this Tuscan territory, and it refers to the social organization in smaller areas and the role of the monastic orders since late Roman and Lombard times.

The wine estates together with a select scientific research group, have carried out studies on both the geological and pedological side of the territory and an in-depth analysis of the territory’s history. The project started during the pandemic, and it has culminated with the production of 500,000 bottles that will be labelled Pieve, and which oversaw the public administration and its boundaries.

The bottles waiting to become Nobile di Montepulciano Pieve are now maturing, and we will have to wait until 2024 to appreciate the extraordinary work done by the consortium and the producers.  The new qualification of the vineyards of Montepulciano lays another brick in the consolidation of identity and a clearer recognition of the extraordinary Tuscan wine territory.

 

MY TASTINGS at “ANTEPRIMA”

My favourite wines:

Winery: Poliziano
Wine: Vino Nobile di Montepulciano Docg 2019

Ruby core with rims. Intense bouquet of cherry with balsamic overtones and slight scent of black pepper. Lovely entrance, round with ripe fruit, medium body. Firm, velvety tannins with a long finish.

Winery: Dei
Wine: Vino Nobile di Montepulciano Docg 2019

Brillant, ruby red with compacted rim. Pronounced flavour of cassis and violet. Spicy with overtones of leather. Full bodied with quite bright acidity. Well balanced with rich red fruit and elegant tannins. Harmonious finish. A charming wine with aging potential.

Winery: Il Mulinaccio
Wine: Vino Nobile di Montepulciano “La Spinosa” Docg 2019

Clean with a deep ruby core. Lovely aromas of ripe plum with a touch of vanilla. Black cherry in the palate with a light toasty scent. Full body with round, sweet tannins. Fresh and harmonious finish. I liked it!

Winery:  Bindella
Wine: Vino Nobile di Montepulciano Docg 2019

Ruby colour turning slightly purple. The nose expresses flavours of red fruit and rhubarb with a hint of mint. The palate is balanced with notes of ripe cherry and prune. Dry and fragrant, with soft tannins and long persistence. Full body with a nice end.  A great wine.

Winery: Tenuta della Talosa “Alboreto”
Wine: Vino Nobile di Montepulciano Docg 2019

Brilliant, deep ruby core with violet hues. Intense flavour of black cherry and liquorice with overtones of lavender and new leather. Fragrant entrance with discrete alcohol and ripe fruit. Sweet, velvety tannins and quite long aftertaste. A harmonious, charming wine…

Winery:  Boscarelli
Wine:  Vino Nobile di Montepulciano Docg 2018 Riserva

Bright with paler reflections. Pronounced flavour of red cherry, wild blueberry, and balsamic notes and anise. Rich and well structured, good balance of body, fruit, acidity, and velvety tannins. An excellent wine.

Winery:  Le Berne
Wine:  Vino Nobile di Montepulciano Docg 2018 Riserva

Brilliant deep red. Attractive bouquet of strawberry and violet mixed with spicy notes of black pepper. Full body with lots of red fruit in the centre palate with smoky scents on the back. It expresses harmony with velvety tannins and long, fresh finish.  A lovely wine.

Winery: La Braccesca
Wine: Vino Nobile di Montepulciano Docg 2018 Riserva, Vigneto Santa Pia

Medium ruby core, paler towards the edge. The wine displays intense flavour of wild berry with scents of new leather. Rich and powerful, good balance of body, fruit, acidity, and firm tannins. A lovely wine with great potential.

Winery: Contucci
Wine: Vino Nobile di Montepulciano Selezione “Mulinvecchio” 2017

Intense and brilliant garnet colour. Its bouquet is intense and ample with notes of blackcurrant and violet. The palate is rich and elegant. Full bodied with impressive freshness and velvety tannins. A long finish. A great wine.

About Montepulciano

The village of Montepulciano is situated on a gentle sloping hill of limestone composition that separates the Val di Chiana from the Val d’Orcia. It is in one of the most popular and explored wine destinations in Tuscany, a symbol of local culture. Montepulciano has been a wine production zone since ancient times and witness to the progress in the cultivation techniques from the Etruscans to the modern days. Among the pillars of the Olympus of wine production in Tuscany, Montepucliano represents an open-air museum of the wine culture of the region. It is an extremely interesting destination for wine enthusiasts and connoisseurs who arrive in this magnificent territory from all over the world.

The charming old town is enriched by Etruscans finds, large Renaissance structures, important churches decorated by illustrious artists, ancient theatres, and local artisan’s shops. It is a charming village full of wonderful peculiarities where you can emerge yourself in its beauty and history and explore with help of one of the best guides of the Tuscan territory: WINE!

Production zone

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vino Nobile Vintage Chart

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Italy’s largest Wine Museum to open in Verona

A few weeks ago, it announced that the city of Verona has the approval to develop a wine museum “Museo del Vino (MuVin)”, with support from the Italian Ministry of Tourism and various Italian tourism agencies. Verona is also hosting Vinitaly, one of the world’s largest wine fairs, a wine museum seems to be a good fit.

“I was in Edinburgh, Scotland, years ago, and there I had the opportunity to visit the popular Scotch Whisky Experience”, said Enrico Corsi of the Veneto Regional Council, who promoted and developed the idea behind the project, to wine news platform Decanter. “I wondered why something similar could not be done with wine in Italy. I realised that we did not have anything comparable in our country, apart from a bunch of smaller private initiatives.”

Minister of Tourism Massimo Garavaglia was pleased with the promotion. “The real innovation here is that, with the MuVin, Verona will become a hub for the whole country and in particular for the Italian wine tourism sector. This project has the capacity to go far, and we’re 100% behind it”, Italian food news platform Foodtop reported.

MuVin is now a €50 million project that will feature a museum, visitor and exhibition centre located in Verona’s Gallerie Mercatali. The venue will be opposite the city’s exhibition area, which hosts a number of popular shows all year-round, including Vinitaly itself. MuVin will also feature an ‘experiential path’ that will show visitors the history of wine, viticulture, wine production, the impact of climate change on wine production, and wine and food pairing.

The museum wants to offer educational activities as well, with wine lovers welcomed to learn wine-tasting techniques as well as to conduct virtual visits to wineries and UNESCO heritage vineyards in augmented reality rooms. According to Corsi, the project should be finished in four years. “We expect MuVin to be ready by 2026, when Northern Italy will host the next Winter Olympics.”

Sources: Decanter, Euronews, Foodtop (Italian), L’Adige (Italian)

 

#wine #winenews #winetrade #winetourism #winemuseum #verona #MuVinVerona
#italianwine #italianwinelovers #Vinitaly #wineandfood #MuseodelVino #MuseodelVinoVerona
#winelovers