FIVE LAWS IMPACTING THE DRINKS WORLD IN 2021

Five Laws Impacting the Drinks World in 2021

http://www.spiritedbiz.com/five-laws-impacting-the-drinks-world-in-2021/

#wine #winenews #cocktails #wineeducation #hospitality #beer #Spirits #wineproduction #industrynews #cannabisdrinks #winelovers #wineeconomics #winebusiness #businessofwine #wineexporting  #winewinewine

Rob Symington on Climate Change: “We Have To Be Activists”

At an online conference this week, members of the International Wineries for Climate Action (IWCA) spoke of the need to “be activists” in order to bring about real change in the fight against carbon emissions.

Founded last year by Familia Torres and Jackson Family Wines, the IWCA is a small but growing group of wineries dedicated to ‘de-carbonizing’ the wine industry and combatting the effects of climate change.

Crucially, the group requires its members to commit to actively lowering its carbon emissions. The requirements upon joining are:

A complete end-to-end (through Scopes 1-3) Greenhouse Gas emissions inventory (which must be completed six months after joining).

At least 20% of power generated through on-site renewable energy.

Demonstrate a reduction of at least 25% in CO2 emissions for every litre of wine produced after a baseline of emissions has been established.

A commitment to reducing total emissions by 50% by 2030 and ‘climate positive’ by 2050.

Speaking at the conference, Familia Torres’ sustainability manager, Josep-Maria Ribas, explained that all the objectives are, “science based”, to allow members to work towards producing real results in how their companies and wineries operate.

Also speaking was Rob Symington of Symington Family Estates, one of the first wineries to sign up to the IWCA. He said that the big challenge when it came to meaningful change in environmental initiatives was to “avoid greenwashing”.

Not wanting to be criticized and being seen to do something had been the “usual approach” in this area for many years and many sceptics are all too eager to pounce on projects – even good ones – that lack some sort of robustness to their processes.

This is why as well as setting its own goals, Symington said that the family-run group had been, “seeking external frameworks where we’re being held accountable to things we said we would do and that’s the most effective way to avoid falling into the trap of greenwashing”.

And while Symington Family Estates, alongside Torres, Jackson and other members, are able to take control of certain emission hotspots in the vineyards and winery more directly – producing their own energy, cutting energy use, adapting their vineyards to the changing climate, etc – there’s also a strong case for ‘activism’.

As Symington continued: “Over 85% of our emissions are beyond our control – they’re produced by the brandy makers we buy spirit from, glassmakers and transportation and so on,” but, he continued, customers at all points are able to “act as lobbyists to change those emissions from our partners”, and “put positive pressure throughout the chain”.

He added that it sometimes seemed at odd for very traditional wineries to act like activists but countered it was also important to, “stick your neck out and sign up to things like the IWCA. We joined to hold our feet to the fire and to justify the steps we need to take”.

Having goals and being held accountable is vital if not only the structural systems are going to change but the culture behind them that enables those structural systems are going to change too.

But given the challenges and threat posed to vineyards and longstanding family companies by climate change, there is also a (perfectly) legitimate form of “enlightened self-interest” in being a champion for the cause, as Symington admitted.

The IWCA is currently comprised of nine members across the Americas, Europe and Antipodes, with another two apparently close to signing up. Membership is not restricted by size and Ribas added it was currently compiling an emissions calculator that would help smaller wineries be able to join and identify where to focus their efforts to meet the entry requirements without the need to hire expensive consultants.

IWCA website – https://www.iwcawine.org/

Sources:  Drinks Business and IWCA

2020 Burgundy Harvest Historically Early and “Unforgettable” Vintage

 

The global pandemic and high temperatures provided new challenges for Burgundy’s growers in the 2020 harvest which ended up being the earliest on record.

The eastern French region, having already experienced a mild autumn and winter in 2019, with only seven days in six months registering below 0°C, then enjoyed beautiful weather from March to September, which led to bud break three weeks earlier than average and one of the fastest starts in 25 years.

Ludivine Griveau, director and winemaker at the Hospices de Beaune, noted in her report that April saw an additional 42 hours of sunshine with temperatures up over 23°C on certain days the vines were soon “bursting with vegetation” and growers were forced to both de-bud and ‘dédoublage’ (remove shoots to reduce foliage and yield) at the same time.

This up-tempo pace in the vineyards throughout the year was further complicated, it must be remembered, by the Covid-related restrictions put in place in France, with those winemakers with young children also having to deal with home-schooling at the same time.

It would be interesting to see which aspect of the year winegrowers ultimately found more challenging.

By April 21 the 2020 cycle was already 24 days ahead of where it had been in 2019, again only the sixth time in 80 years that one vintage had been so far ahead of its predecessor.

Flowering began towards the end of April and was extremely successful. As the summer went on high temperatures and steady winds kept the crop in a largely pristine state but the lack of rainfall posed its own issues.

Luckily, despite being so mild, the end of 2019 had been wetter than normal which would prove helpful as, from March onwards, rain showers were infrequent and tended to be localized. There were instances of water deficits and resulting vine stress as well as some sunburn on bunches.

Interestingly, Griveau said that: “Wind is now an important climatic component, not only of this vintage, but also of previous vintages. In recent years, it has been quite ‘new’ to Burgundy to have this wind every day and almost all day long. If it is our ally in maintaining the perfect sanitary state of 2020, it nevertheless gives us less respite and fewer weather ‘windows’ for the application of our treatments.

“The wind also has the consequence of drying out the land, at least on the surface, making it sometimes difficult to work because it hardens [the topsoil].”

Different appellations, sometimes areas within appellations, saw staggered rates of maturity, which then meant vigneron had to be on their toes to harvest what was needed at the right time as the time approached.

Griveau said that: “We saw a noticeable variation of stages within a plot, and sometimes in Chardonnay, the phenomenon of coulure was marked, the structures of the bunches were long and airy, and the millerandage was at times not negligible. The pre-flowering conditions having been more favourable to Pinot Noir, meant it had better passed the bud burst and its berries were more regular in size. The Pinot was slightly ahead of the Chardonnay at precisely this point in the vegetative cycle.”

With the vines so far advanced (and the wasps beginning to notice) the first crop began to be gathered in on 12 August in the southern region of the Mâconnais – one of the earliest harvest starts on record and one echoed elsewhere in France as well.

Griveau authorized the harvesting of white grapes for the Hospices on 18 August and the estate’s entire crop was gathered in by August 29 – the first time in its history harvesting was finished inside of August.

The Bourgogne Interprofession (BIVB) said in a statement that the overarching tendency among the white wines was “beautiful aromatic complexity”, intense fruit but also “very good acidity” in spite of the high summer temperatures.

The reds meanwhile have very deep colour and concentration but, like the whites, “they have kept their freshness” and have a distinctly black fruit profile.

Griveau concluded: “The vinification process went perfectly for both white and red wines, and the balances that have emerged in our wines are extraordinary, and, let’s admit it, quite unexpected. The sunny side of the vintage is there, but the wines reveal an impressive aromatic freshness. Acidities are very present, and the densities are already felt. The whites have substance, without too high an alcohol content. The tannins of the reds are supple but powerful.

“The ingredients of a great vintage, which, for many reasons, is unforgettable, are all present.”

Sources:
BIVB
Drinks Business

Pouilly-Fuissé officially has its Premier Cru!

After a 12-year application process, the French National Institute of Origin and Quality (INAO) approved the classification making PouillyFuissé the first appellation within Burgundy’s Mâconnais sub-region to benefit from premier cru vineyards.

It’s a new era for Pouilly-Fuissé and probably for Mâconnais, joining now the prestigious classification established a long time ago in the Côte de Beaune and Côte de Nuits. The 22 “Premier Cru” represent a total of 194 ha under vine, accounting for 24 % of Pouilly-Fuissé’s total vineyard area (800 ha exclusively located on the four villages of Chaintré, Fuissé, Solutré-Pouilly and Vergisson).

The conditions of production of the Premier Cru are:

Maximum yield 56 hl/ha

Minimum soil’s rest of 3 years before replantation

No chemical herbicides

Minimum time of aging until July 1st

 

 

 

 

 

 

“THE GRAPES FOR HUMANITY – SAVE HOSPITALITY FINE WINE CHARITY AUCTION

 

 Over 300 lots of exceptional wines, winery tours, autographed bottles

guitars donated by Rock and Roll Hall of Famers

Geddy Lee and Alex Lifeson of Rush

 

Monday September 28th – Wednesday October 7th, 2020
Online through
Waddington’s Auctioneers & Appraisers

Grapes for Humanity invites you to Save the Date for our “Save Hospitality Fundraiser” virtual fine wine auction September 28th – October 7th, 2020, presented by Waddington’s Auctioneers and Appraisers.  This special auction features not only some of the world’s finest and rarest wines, but also many lots of exceptional ready-to-drink wines from the finest wine regions.

“After years of enjoying their service, it’s our turn to serve them,” said Geddy Lee. “The Chefs, Sommeliers, Waitstaff, Delivery personnel, Farmers, Fisherman, Bakers and more whose livelihood has evaporated virtually overnight. Right now we must throw a lifeline to those who need us. I reached out to some fellow wine lovers and asked them to raid their wine cellars to help us raise funds to support staff and independent restaurant owners to weather this storm.”

At the top we have multiple vintages of first-growth Bordeaux and Grand Cru Burgundy, four vintages of the world’s rarest port, Quinto do Noval Nacional, 18 vintages of Australia’s most famous wine Penfold’s Grange, Pinot Noirs from the only two great growths of New Zealand Ata Rangi and Felton Road and 25 lots of the inaugural Cuvee of the Heart Pinot Noir and Chardonnay blended by Thomas Bachelder Canada’s leading winemaker from contributions of 30+ Ontario winemakers! The Ferragamo lot features a 3 litre of their best wine Il Borro plus a tour, tasting, a dinner and a three night stay at their Relais et Chateau resort in the heart of Tuscany. We have rare verticals from historic Ontario wineries such as Cave Springs and Henry of Pelham.

For buyers seeking immediate enjoyment, we have Malbec from the historic Patagonian producer Humberto Canale, Sancerre from the 500 hundred year old Joseph Mellot winery in the Loire, powerful rich wines from Bodega Numanthia in Toro Spain, some of British Columbia’s finest plus award winning wines from Pond View Estates here in Ontario and mixed lots from exceptional wineries.

Whether you are looking for something to savour with tonight’s dinner or some wine to treasure and hold for future enjoyment…this auction has it all and more. However, don’t take our word for it, peruse the Auction Catalogue.

Proceeds will directly benefit Ontario Hospitality front-line workers through the Toronto Restaurant Workers Relief Fund; the Bartender’s Benevolent Fund; and independent Ontario restaurants through savehospitality.ca.  To find out more about Grapes for Humanity, visit grapesforhumanity.com.

Vintage wines, collectible rarities, memorabilia, and once-in-a-lifetime wine experiences for the emerging collector as well as the aficionado, this rare opportunity offers exceptional wine from multiple producers, varying vintages, and unique experiences.

Bid once, bid often and prepare to delight in your purchase for a good cause.

To donate funds or for more information, contact: 2dry@rogers.com