Private Clients and Investors invited to bid at Hospices de Nuits-Saint-Georges Wine Auction on March 14, 2021

This year, for the first time, Burgundian producer Maison Edouard Delaunay is allowing a limited number of private clients and investors the chance to bid at this spring’s 60th Hospices de Nuits Wine Auction which will be held March 14th, 2021.

Since 1961, this “en primeur” sale of 228-litre barrels has been solely for trade buyers, until this year, the négociant will allow a number of private collectors to bid for the first time.

Prospective buyers can purchase a minimum of 24 bottles. They will be welcome (Covid restrictions dependent) to stay at Château de Gilly on Friday, March 12, with a visit to the Maison Delaunay winery on Saturday and then attend a tasting and lunch at the Hospices de Nuits on the day of the auction, Sunday, March 14, 2021.

The wines sold will finish their aging in the cellars of Maison Edouard Delaunay, at Étang Vergy, under the supervision of cellar master Christophe Briotet, recently nominated “best winemaker in the world” by the “International Wine Challenge”.

A Historical Relationship
The historic relationship between Maison Edouard Delaunay and the Hospices de Nuits began long before the first auction in 1961, when Laurent Delaunay’s grandfather bought Hospices de Nuits wines by mutual, exclusive agreement.

The Charity – Hospices de Nuits
Hospices de Nuits consists of a working hospital, a retirement home and one of the most beautiful collections of vineyards of Nuits-Saint-Georges and the Côte de Nuits whose wines are sold at the traditional March auction.

The Hospices de Nuits was founded in 1270 and is historically older than Hospices de Beaune which was founded in 1443. The Hospices de Nuits began offering its wine at auction 60 years ago. Over the centuries the Hospice has been bequeathed numerous vineyards which today comprises of 12.5 hectares. Most of the vineyards are in Nuits-Saint-Georges, covering six parcels of village appellations and nine premier crus, and including Les Didiers.

Laurent Delaunay states: “To bid at the Hospices de Nuits combines the pleasure of buying top wines with the joy of contributing to a great charity.”

For further information, and details of how to sign up and bid https://burgundyauction.wine/

Auction Update:   Les Dames d’Escoffier Ontario “Festive Gift Basket” Fundraiser-Auction 

We are excited to announce that our Les Dames d’Escoffier Ontario “Festive Gift Basket” Fundraiser-Auction has raised over $1,000.00 as of this morning!   

To place a bid, you will be asked to create a login using an email address and password. Verify your email and you’re good to bid. Scroll through all the offerings and place your bids! Once the bid is submitted, you will get email updates, so you don’t miss out on your favorite item/s!

https://www.32auctions.com/LesDamesON

The auction closes in two days!!!

Here are three ways you can help:

1. Bid Now!  Your generosity will help fund 2020/2021 student educational scholarships and bursaries.

2. Tell friends about our auction and others who might like to participate.

3. If you don’t see anything you like, you can still contribute by using the green “Donate” button on the upper right-hand corner of the auction site.

The bidding ends at 5:00 p.m. December 12, 2020.

Auction website:

https://www.32auctions.com/LesDamesON

Thank you for your participation and support!

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Rob Symington on Climate Change: “We Have To Be Activists”

At an online conference this week, members of the International Wineries for Climate Action (IWCA) spoke of the need to “be activists” in order to bring about real change in the fight against carbon emissions.

Founded last year by Familia Torres and Jackson Family Wines, the IWCA is a small but growing group of wineries dedicated to ‘de-carbonizing’ the wine industry and combatting the effects of climate change.

Crucially, the group requires its members to commit to actively lowering its carbon emissions. The requirements upon joining are:

A complete end-to-end (through Scopes 1-3) Greenhouse Gas emissions inventory (which must be completed six months after joining).

At least 20% of power generated through on-site renewable energy.

Demonstrate a reduction of at least 25% in CO2 emissions for every litre of wine produced after a baseline of emissions has been established.

A commitment to reducing total emissions by 50% by 2030 and ‘climate positive’ by 2050.

Speaking at the conference, Familia Torres’ sustainability manager, Josep-Maria Ribas, explained that all the objectives are, “science based”, to allow members to work towards producing real results in how their companies and wineries operate.

Also speaking was Rob Symington of Symington Family Estates, one of the first wineries to sign up to the IWCA. He said that the big challenge when it came to meaningful change in environmental initiatives was to “avoid greenwashing”.

Not wanting to be criticized and being seen to do something had been the “usual approach” in this area for many years and many sceptics are all too eager to pounce on projects – even good ones – that lack some sort of robustness to their processes.

This is why as well as setting its own goals, Symington said that the family-run group had been, “seeking external frameworks where we’re being held accountable to things we said we would do and that’s the most effective way to avoid falling into the trap of greenwashing”.

And while Symington Family Estates, alongside Torres, Jackson and other members, are able to take control of certain emission hotspots in the vineyards and winery more directly – producing their own energy, cutting energy use, adapting their vineyards to the changing climate, etc – there’s also a strong case for ‘activism’.

As Symington continued: “Over 85% of our emissions are beyond our control – they’re produced by the brandy makers we buy spirit from, glassmakers and transportation and so on,” but, he continued, customers at all points are able to “act as lobbyists to change those emissions from our partners”, and “put positive pressure throughout the chain”.

He added that it sometimes seemed at odd for very traditional wineries to act like activists but countered it was also important to, “stick your neck out and sign up to things like the IWCA. We joined to hold our feet to the fire and to justify the steps we need to take”.

Having goals and being held accountable is vital if not only the structural systems are going to change but the culture behind them that enables those structural systems are going to change too.

But given the challenges and threat posed to vineyards and longstanding family companies by climate change, there is also a (perfectly) legitimate form of “enlightened self-interest” in being a champion for the cause, as Symington admitted.

The IWCA is currently comprised of nine members across the Americas, Europe and Antipodes, with another two apparently close to signing up. Membership is not restricted by size and Ribas added it was currently compiling an emissions calculator that would help smaller wineries be able to join and identify where to focus their efforts to meet the entry requirements without the need to hire expensive consultants.

IWCA website – https://www.iwcawine.org/

Sources:  Drinks Business and IWCA

“Connaught Bar” in London is named The World’s Best Bar, as The World’s 50 Best Bars List 2020 is revealed

The World’s 50 Best Bars were announced yesterday in London via a virtual awards ceremony, with London’s “Connaught Bar” clinching the No. 1 spot.

The awards’ list is organized by William Reed Business Media, which also produces The World’s 50 Best Restaurants list.

The 2020 winners

This year’s list includes bars from 23 countries, with 11 new entries.

The U.K. had the strongest showing, with bars in London accounting for eight of its nine rankings. Europe took 21 spots in total, more than Asia’s 15 and twice that of the Americas — North and South America lodged 10 slots in total.

Connaught Bar is known for its martini trolley, which allows waiters to prepare drinks at your table. Singapore dominated Asia’s rankings, with four bars being named among the world’s best, an outsized showing for the city-state that is home to nearly 5.7 million people. Tokyo registered three bars on the list, while Hong Kong and Taipei each netted two.

Sydney accounts for Australia’s three rankings, while Dubai’s Zuma bar gave the Middle East its sole award.

The full list includes

Connaught Bar, London

Dante, New York

The Clumsies, Athens

Atlas, Singapore

Tayer + Elementary, London

Kwant, London

Florería Atlántico, Buenos Aires

Coa, Hong Kong

Jigger & Pony, Singapore

The SG Club, Tokyo

Maybe Sammy, Sydney

Attaboy, New York

Nomad Bar, New York

Manhattan, Singapore

The Old Man, Hong Kong

Katana Kitten, New York

Licorería Limantour, Mexico City

Native, Singapore

Paradiso, Barcelona

American Bar, London

Carnaval, Lima

Salmon Guru, Madrid

Zuma, Dubai

Little Red Door, Paris

1930, Milan

Two Schmucks, Barcelona

El Copitas, St. Petersburg

Cantina OK!, Sydney

Lyaness, London

Himkok, Oslo

Baba Au Rum, Athens

Panda & Sons, Edinburgh

Swift, London

Three Sheets, London

The Bamboo Bar, Bangkok

Tjoget, Stockholm

Buck and Breck, Berlin

Employees Only, New York

Bulletin Place, Sydney

Bar Benfiddich, Tokyo

Artesian, London

Sober Company, Shanghai

Indulge Experimental Bistro, Taipei

Bar Trigona, Kuala Lumpur

Drink Kong, Rome

Room by Le Kief, Taipei

Alquimico, Cartagena

High Five, Tokyo

Charles H., Seoul

Presidente, Buenos Aires

 

This year, the voting process changed to highlight emerging bar scenes around the globe, said Mark Sansom, content editor for The World’s 50 Best Bars.

The 50 Best organization appointed an outside chairperson to 20 geographical regions around the world. Each chairperson then chose a voting panel for each region, which cumulatively formed the organization’s voting “Academy.”

“The 540-strong Academy is made up of drinks experts, including bartenders, bar managers, drinks consultants, brand ambassadors, drinks writers, historians and cocktail aficionados who are selected for their knowledge of the international bar scene,” said Sansom.