Hermitage Launches Online Charity Wine Auction

Hermitage, the Rhône Valley wine appellation has launched its online wine auction, which is now open for bidding until Tuesday, June 21-  4 pm via the fine wine auction marketplace Bid For Wine https://www.bidforwine.co.uk/legendary-hermitage.

The lots available to bid on have been donated by Hermitage winemakers with some unique vintages for wine lovers and collectors.

The Centre Médical de La Teppe (France) and The Epilepsy Society (UK) are the two charities that have been chosen for the auction, with all proceeds being donated equally between the two.

Hermitage is also hosting their ‘Legendary Hermitage’ event at the Four Seasons Hotel, London, at Ten Trinity Square on Monday June 20th. The event is hosted by several of the Hermitage winemakers which includes a tasting of the prestigious cuvées available on the UK market, and a gastronomic dinner curated by award-winning chef, Anne-Sophie Pic. Chef Pic is the most decorated female chef in the world, with eight Michelin stars to her name.

Michel Chapoutier, president of the Hermitage appellation, said: “Our Legendary Hermitage event is an opportunity to share our wines with the UK wine trade, and along with our online charity wine auction, we are also helping out some charities which are important to our winemakers. We can’t wait to meet everyone and allow them to taste some exciting wines, some of which they won’t have tasted before.”

The auction lots include:

Lot 1 – Maison Les Alexandrins 2020, White – 6 bottles

Lot 2 – Christelle Betton, Arpège 2004-2011-2019, White (3 bottles)

Lot 3 – Maison M.Chapoutier, Vin de Paille 1999, Magnum

Lot 4 – Maison M.Chapoutier, Pavillon 2007, Red, Magnum

Lot 5 – Maison M.Chapoutier, De l’Orée 2007, White, Mathusalem

Lot 6 – Maison Jean-Louis Chave, Red 2015, Jeroboam

Lot 7 – Delas Frères, Domaine des Tourettes 2015, White, Jeroboam

Lot 8 – Ferraton Père & Fils – 6 bottles

Les Miaux 1998, White (2 bottles)

Les Dionnières 2001, Red (2 bottles)

Le Méal 2001, Red (2 bottles)

Lot 9- Ferraton Père & Fils – 6 bottles

Les Miaux 1998, White (2 bottles)

Les Dionnières 2001, Red (2 bottles)

Le Méal 2001, Red (2 bottles)

Lot 10 – Maison Guigal – 6 bottles

Ex-Voto 2012, Red (3 bottles)

Ex-Voto 2012, White (3 bottles)

Lot 11 – Maison Paul Jaboulet Aîné, La Chapelle 2006, Red, Jeroboam

Lot 12 – Maison Paul Jaboulet Aîné, La Chapelle 1982-1985-2009-2012-2015-2016, Red (6 bottles)

Lot 13 – Domaine des Martinelles – 6 magnums

Domaine des Martinelles 2013, Red, Magnum (2 magnums)

Domaine des Martinelles 2015, Red, Magnum (2 magnums)

Domaine des Martinelles 2020, White, Magnum (2 magnums)

Lot 14 – Gabriel Meffre, Laurus 2015, Red – 3 bottles

Lot 15 – Domaine Marc Sorrel, Le Gréal 2018, Red – 3 bottles

Lot 16 – Cave de Tain, Gambert de Loche 2015, Red, Jeroboam

Lot 17 – Maison Tardieu-Laurent 2006, White – 6 bottles

Lot 18 – Maison Tardieu-Laurent 2005, Red – 6 bottles

Lot 19 – Les Vins de Vienne, La Bachole 2010, White – 2 bottles

Lot 20 – Les Vins de Vienne, Les Chirats de Saint-Christophe 2009, Red – 2 bottles

#rhonevalley #hermitage #bidforwine #AnneSophiePic #rhonewine #wineauction #wine #redwine #whitewine #winelovers #winecollectors #wineinvestors #wineandfood #womeninfood #womeninwine #Michelinstarred #Michelin #chef  #RhoneValleyWines

List of Michelin-starred Restaurants in Europe Under 30 Euros

Travel restrictions are FINALLY relaxing across Europe and it’s now time to travel and spoil yourself!  Good News! You can surprisingly dine at a Michelin-starred restaurant without breaking the bank and here is their advice – shift from a dinner reservation to a lunch reservation. Most restaurants offer a menu du jour, or menu of the day at lunch, which is more affordable than the regular tasting menu at dinner.

Chef’s Pencil recently featured a map of the top Michelin-starred “most affordable” restaurants in Europe (under 30 Euros) – here is their top 10 for you to try!

  1. L’Antic Molí, Ulldecona, Spain – 20 euros / person

 L’Antic Molí is one of the best restaurants in Spain and is about a two-hour drive south of Barcelona, ​​is the most affordable Michelin-starred restaurant in Europe. Here, surrounded by greenery and with a beautiful panoramic view, you’ll spend 20 /person for a lunch by chef Vicent Guimerà Sales, if you choose to have lunch in the Espai Bistro.

  1. La Robe, Montaigu, France – 24 euros / person

La Robe restaurant in Montaigu, France, is in the Pays de la Loire region. The dining room is spread over two floors. Here you can taste chef Xavier Giraudet’s lunch dishes at affordable prices.

  1. Hostellerie la Montagne, Colombey-les-Deux-Églises, France – 25 euros / person

The Hostellerie la Montagne – a Michelin-star restaurant located in Colombey-les-Deux-Églises in the Haute-Marne department of France’s Grande Est region.  This is the region where the former French president Charles de Gaulle lived (and later buried). This is why the restaurant’s dining room is called A la table du General (at the General’s table). Chef Jean-Baptiste Natali proposes a lunch ‘menu du marché’, a market menu, starting at 25 euros, consisting of an entrée, main course and dessert.

  1. Les Clefs d’Argent, Mont-de-Marsan, France – 25 euros / person

Another French restaurant, Les Clefs d’Argent in Mont-de-Marsan, is located in the southwestern part of the Hexagon. Here, chef Christophe Dupouy offers a menu that interprets the flavours of the territory in a contemporary key, with an exotic spin. A ‘très chic’ address, where you can stop and try ‘Le Menu Retour du Marché’, three dishes prepared according to the produce of the day and Christophe’s inspiration, available only for lunch from Tuesday to Friday.

  1. Essência, Budapest, Hungary – 25 euros / person

Essência can be found in Budapest, and is the restaurant led by the Portuguese-Hungarian couple Tiago and Éva Sabarigo. Guests can savour an original menu that draws on Hungarian and Portuguese cuisine, choosing a “fusion” tasting-menu that combines the two cultures. Among the most convenient options, there is no shortage of proposals for lunch starting from 25 euros / person.

  1. Hotel Restaurant Le France, Villers-le-Lac, France – 26 euros / person

The Hotel Restaurant Le France is in the heart of the Haut-Doubs. Here, chef Hugues Droz tempts you with creative dishes, capable of blending flavours, colours and great technique. All can be savoured in a warm environment, where design meets the territory, including refined details and decorative elements made with local materials.

  1. Le Mascaret, Blainville-sur-Mer, France – 26 euros / person

Le Mascaret is located in the spaces of a former convent for women in Blainville-sur-Mer, a small town in Normandy. The setting is decidedly baroque, but with a modern touch, while the dishes by chef Philippe Hardy are super-creative and well defined. With a ‘la petite table’ formula, at lunch, guests can try a very economical fine-dining experience: at 26 euros / person, the menu includes dishes revisited by the chef with a ‘French touch’, capable of combining tradition and modernity.

  1. Silabario, Vigo, Spain – 27 euros / person

The Silabario restaurant is located in Vigo, in the region of Galicia, in the north-west of Spain. Here, right under an imposing glass dome that houses the headquarters of the Real Club Celta de Vigo football team, chef Alberto González Prelcic prepares a delicious array of dishes with fresh ingredients from the local market at a very affordable price. The menu, at 27 euros / person, is available from Monday – Thursday for lunch and dinner, while only for lunch on Friday.

  1. Auberge du Cep, Fleurie, France – 27 euros / person

Auberge du Cep is located on a famous Burgundy wine route, in the Beaujolais region. The restaurant is led by chef Aurélien Merot, who stands out for iconic dishes with a very French style, mainly focused on jus and sauces. There are several tasting menus to combine with the remarkable selection of regional wines. Try the ‘menu du marché Grille-Midi’ for 27 euros, served every day for lunch, except Saturdays and public holidays (one starter, one main course and one dessert).

  1. La Grange de Belle-Église, Belle-Église, France – 27 euros / person

The Michelin-starred restaurant La Grange de Belle-Église, located in Belle-Église, in northern France, expresses the quintessence of French gastronomic attitude according to Chef’s Pencil. Directed by chef Marc Duval, who offers dishes prepared with high-quality ingredients and a wide selection of Bordeaux wines and champagnes. The menu du marché is served at midday, during the week (except holidays), and offers fresh seasonal produce.

 

Sources:  Michelin/Chef’s Pencil

#michelin #michelinstar #chef #instachef #wine #winelovers #foodandwine #finedining #gourmet #funsunday #Sunday #travelling #europe #traveldiaries #champagne #burgundy #bordeau #frenchwine #frenchfood #foodie #restaurant #michelinrestaurant #spanishfood #winesofspain #hungarianfood #winesofhungary

Arizona adds another viticulture area “Verde Valley” 

Arizona’s Verde Valley is often referred to as the state’s second Grand Canyon. It now has a new distinction as an American Viticultural Area designating the unique geography, topography, soils, and climate as a recognized grape growing area.

Now the third AVA in Arizona, Verde Valley joins Sonoita and Willcox.  Verde Valley Wine Consortium president Tom Schumacher, first submitted a petition in 2017, called it a reason to cheer and “a fruitful end to an arduous effort.”

Michael Pierce, director of Viticulture and Enology at Yavapai College, adds: “It was five years in the making, so we’re very relieved it’s finally accomplished.”

Located in the geographic center of the state, the Verde Valley AVA encompasses about 220 square miles near Oak Creek and the Verde River. The Verde Valley Wine Trail shows 19 commercial vineyards farming 135-plus acres of wine grapes with another 25 acres planned for upcoming planting. The region boasts 25 tasting rooms.

Today, vineyards in the AVA grow over 40 wine grape varieties from Malvasia Blanca, Viognier, and Chardonnay on the white side to reds like Syrah, Petite Syrah, and Cabernet Sauvignon.

The AVA is surrounded by higher elevations and steeper slopes like the Mogollon Rim and the Black Hills. “Verde Valley AVA’s topography positively affects viticulture,” according to published reports.

“The gentle slopes allow for easier vineyard management as cooler air draining from the higher elevations provides a diurnal temperature swing that slows the maturity of wine grapes, extends the growing season, and leads to more complex wine flavors.”

#Arizonawine #AZwine #Arizona #vineyard#VerdeValleyWineConsortium #AVA #wine #winelovers #winecountry #USWine #winenews #Arizonawinecountry @VerdeValleyWineConsortium

The Trabocchi Coast – Abruzzo

I’m just back from Abruzzo, Italy – It’s a fascinating region of majestic mountains, national parks, stunning seascapes, charming villages, breathtaking views, and exceptional wines.

The coast of Abruzzo ranges from flat golden sandy beaches to dramatic coastlines with high cliffs to pebble beaches, which is on the Adriatic Sea.  The water temperature can reach 28 degrees in the summer. I was told by the local lifeguards that you can swim starting in April to the first week of October.  It’s interesting to note that Abruzzo has one of the highest densities of “blue flag” beaches in Italy!

What I found fascinating is the “Trabocchi Coast” a UNESCO World Heritage-protected for its traditional wooden fishing structures “Trabocchi.” This stunning 70-kilometer coast goes from Ortona to San Salvo (Chieti) and is a beautiful drive where you can see the striking collection of these stilt wooden huts. Some have been left abandoned, which make them more mystical, and some have been turned into restaurants.

Trabocchi were constructed by local fishermen in the 18th Century and were simply an extension of the rocky coastline. In order to facilitate fishing, boards were placed on the submerged rocks on the beaches so the fishermen could fish further offshore. Gradually, wooden stilts were used to erect freestanding platforms, which allowed the fishermen to project further out into the sea and were connected to land by long narrow boardwalks. The local fisherman fished for for anchovies, sardines, sea bream and sea bass.

The Trabocchi have been described as “colossal spiders” and “machines that seemed to live their own lives”  Gabriele D’Annunzio.

After speaking to locals, I found out that some of the Trabocchi are a few centuries old and still belong to fishing families.

It truly was an amazing experience .. walking along the boardwalk suspended above the sea, the smell of algae and crashing waves over the rocks – the atmosphere is both magical and romantic.

Having dinner on the Trabocchi we ate fresh fish and drank local white wines Pecorino and Trebbiano d’Abruzzo – an unforgettable evening with amazing views!

The “Trabocchi Experience” is a must when you visit Abruzzo!

#consorziotutelavinidabruzzo #montepulcianodabruzzo #cerasuolodabruzzo #trebbianodabruzzo #abruzzodoc #abruzzopecorino #winelovers #italy #discoverabruzzo #abruzzowines #abruzzowineinusa #vinidabruzzo #discoverabruzzowine #abruzzotourism #italianwine #Trabocchi #italianwinelovers #vinidAbruzzo

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UC Davis Library Acquires “Le débat du vin et de leaue” the first wine book written in French [dated 1515]

The UC Davis Library, Archives and Special Collections recently acquired Le débat du vin et de leaue with help from a $38,000 gift from the B.H. Breslauer Foundation. The book, a debate between wine and water by Pierre Jamec (or Japes), is the first known book about wine published in French. This edition was printed around 1515 and was bound later by Antoine Bauzonnet, one of the great French bookbinders of the early 19th century. It is the only known copy of its printing.

The book’s topic, a debate between water and wine personified, is an offshoot of the classical-era poems and fables that were used to define virtues and dictate how people should live. The debate between water and wine, which initially appeared in Greek, was popular among the Goliards, wandering medieval scholars who frequented taverns. The text of Le débat first appeared as Denudata veritae in the 12th century. The French version of the poem dates to the 14th or early 15th century.

The library’s earliest item on wine is a 12th-century bifolium from the library of the legendary wine merchant, gourmand, wine writer and bibliophile André Simon (1877–1890). The earliest printed item about wine in the rare book collection is the text of a complaint printed in 1500 on behalf of the City of Nuremberg, against a Brandenburg official who levied a wine duty on shipments for the city. Until now, the library’s earliest French book on wine was Deuis sur la Vigne, Vin et Vendages (1549). Le débat du vin et de leaue is now the library’s earliest French work on wine and the only record of the popular, historical debate in the library’s collections.

Sources:
Gary Price
UC Davis Library – Archives and Special Collections

#winebooks #winebook #library #winelovers #frenchwinebok #ACdavis #historicbook #winebookcollectors #winenews #winereading #books #winelife #winereaders #wineeducation