LUCK OF THE IRISH! JAMESONS LAUNCHES A MONTH-LONG ST PATRICK’S DAY CELEBRATION

Jameson Irish Whiskey is launching St Patrick’s Day celebrations that will run for the full month of March, which includes a series of party-at-home kits, competitions and live-streamed music events.

The celebrations start on March 3rd with a revival of Jameson’s partnership with online music broadcasting platform Boiler Room, with streaming sets each Wednesday in the run up to St Patrick’s Day. The two performances, which can be streamed live via the Jameson Connects platform, feature local bands including Dublin Rap and Indie. This will culminate in an immersive gig on St Patrick’s Day [17 March], with a Grammy nominated Toronto-based singer-songwriter Jessie Reyez performing some of her critically acclaimed tracks including Coffin, Shutter Island and Figures. Other performers include Dublin rappers Denise Chalia and Kojaque, R&B artist Savannah-Re, and Canadian rapper Junia-T.

The aim is to showcase emerging talent and creatives from across the world to celebrate hometowns and communities. The live gig will be accessible only through Jameson’s online partners, or via its Jameson Connects platform, available across four time zones. Fans can sign up for free tickets and check performance times on the Jameson Connects website. https://www.jamesonwhiskey.com/en-EN/join-in/jameson-connects

Jameson is also teaming up with Brooklyn-based internet football club, Nowhere FC to create a collection of three limited edition football shirts, and accessories. Fans can join the team, when the collection launches March 10th via Jameson.com and NwFC’s website.

The brand is also offering fans the chance to win a “once in a lifetime St Patrick’s Day experience” for 2022.

Brendan Buckley, international marketing Director at Irish Distillers said St Patrick’s Day is a day to celebrate all that Ireland represents – culture, music and togetherness. “Jameson is ensuring that this year is no different as the whiskey brings its proud Irish spirit to life through a series of global virtual events and collaborations that encourage everyone to adapt an Irish state of mind and join in to safely celebrate St Patrick’s Day 2021.”

#JamesonIrishWhiskey #IrishWhiskey #IrishWhiskeylover #stpatricksday #irish #ireland #stpattysday #green #luckoftheirish #shamrock #stpaddysday #kissmeimirish #stpatrick #saintpatricksday

A Scientific Journal Proves Terroir’s Influence on Whisky  

A recent scientific study conducted by Foods, a scientific journal of food science has provided “conclusive proof” of terroir’s influence on whisky. The researchers say that this paves the way for an “Appellation Controlée System” of provenance similar to that used for wine.

The whisky industry has long been debating the influence of terroir on whisky, with some claiming that any effect would not ‘survive’ the distillation process. However, the authors of this academic paper say they have found proof of terroir’s existence in whisky.

The paper, entitled ‘The Impact of Terroir on the Flavour of Single Malt Whisk(e)y New Make Spirit’, was published February 18th, 2021 by the Whisky Terroir Project, a joint venture between Waterford Distillery in Ireland, Oregon State University, Teagasc Food Research Centre, Enterprise Ireland, Minch Malt and the Irish Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine.

The study explores the differences found in spirits made from two barley varieties: Olympus and Laureate, which are grown on two farms in different environments in 2017 and 2018. One sample was grown in Athy in County Kildare, while another was cultivated in Bunclody, County Wexford.

Each sample was micro-malted and distilled under laboratory conditions to produce 32 whisky distillate samples. These samples were then tested using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry–olfactometry (GC/MS-O) technology as well as by a panel of sensory experts.

The tests isolated over 42 different flavour compounds, half of which researchers said were “directly influenced by the barley’s terroir”.

Eight of these compounds – (E)-2-nonenal, β-damascenone, 3-methyl-1-butanol, furfural, ethyl hexanoate and 1 unidentified compound (unknown 10 with a herbal/grass character) – were deemed the most influential, with a further 15 having an impact on the aroma, but to a lesser extent.

Barley grown in the sheltered inland Athy site had higher pH levels and increased calcium, magnesium and molybdenum in its limestone-based soil. Temperatures were higher and more consistent than the more exposed Bunclody site, with lower rainfall. The new make spirit produced from barley grown in Athy had flavours of toasted almond, with a malty, biscuity and oily finish.

Bunclody’s barley, which was grown on shale-based soil with increased amounts of iron, copper and manganese, produced a spirit that was lighter and more floral with fresh fruit flavours. The site was closer to the coast and experienced more changeable weather conditions.

Dr. Dustin Herb, the lead researcher, and post-doctoral research at Oregon State University, states: “This interdisciplinary study investigated the basis of terroir by examining the genetic, physiological, and metabolic mechanisms of barley contributing to whisky flavour. Using standardised malting and distillation protocols, we preserved distinct flavours associated with the testing environments and observed year-to-year variations, indicating that terroir is a significant contributor to whisky flavour.”

“Critics claimed any terroir effect would be destroyed by the whisky-making process, saying there is no scientific evidence to prove that terroir even exists. Well, there is now.”

The paper concluded: “This study has clearly demonstrated variations in the contribution of the aroma active volatiles and sensory attributes in these new make spirits and reflects changes in barley growth in relation to environmental elements including soil nutrients and prevailing seasonal weather patterns, and therefore reveals a “terroir” effect.

“This has not been previously determined and creates the possibility of producing whisk(e)y from different “vintage” with new make spirit that encompass the factors impacting on the growth of the barley variety as well as the subsequent processing parameters.

“Further research is required to better understand the specific environmental impact on barley growth and the management and processing thereof with respect to the genetic, physiological, and metabolic mechanisms contributing to the terroir expression of new make spirit and whisk(e)y.”

Source:  Foods, www.mdpi.com

Jameson enters flavored spirits market with “Cold Brew” coffee-infused Whiskey

Earlier this week Jameson unveiled Jameson Cold Brew, an Irish Whiskey infused with natural cold brew coffee.

“By combining the smooth taste of triple-distilled Jameson and the richness of natural cold brew coffee flavor into one bottle, Jameson Cold Brew celebrates a passion for whiskey and coffee,” explains Matt Foley, Jameson brand director at Pernod Ricard USA. “When we started researching our next innovation, we didn’t need to go far, as it had been under our nose all along.”

As the Jameson community has a passion for Irish Whiskey and craft coffee, the brand says it listened to what Jameson fans had been requesting for years. The result is Jameson Cold Brew.

“The spirits category is constantly evolving, with consumers seeking new tastes and ways to enjoy a drink,” adds Foley. “Jameson Cold Brew is a delicious option for any occasion from brunch to happy hour. Enjoy Jameson Cold Brew chilled, on the rocks, mixed with cola, or in a cocktail. My personal favorite is on the rocks.”

Tasting Notes:
Jameson Cold Brew has a nose of coffee bean combined with the vanilla nuttiness of Irish whiskey, the company says. On the palate, you’ll find coffee and charred wood from the pot still, plus notes of toasted oak and dark chocolate.

Jameson Cold Brew is 60 proof, 30% ABV. It retails for a suggested price of $24.99 per 750-ml. bottle.

Website – for further details: https://www.jamesonwhiskey.com/en-CA/

Powers Irish Whiskey Rebrands

Pernod Ricard targets “new generation” with a redesign of its Powers Irish whiskey brand.

The group’s Irish Distillers unit, which handles Powers, said last week that the design will “inspire a new generation” of Irish whiskey consumers. The overhaul includes a squatter bottle and a new label incorporating the diamond ‘P’ trademark, one of the first registered in Ireland.

Following the official launch of the rebranding Powers Gold Label in March, the update will be introduced across Powers Three Swallow and Powers John’s Lane from mid-2020 in the US and the rest of the world towards the end of the year. In Ireland, Powers Three Swallow and Powers John’s Lane will roll out in March. Powers Gold Label will be reviewed “in due course”, Irish Distillers said.

Conor McQuaid, CEO of the division, said: “Powers has been famous for its bold taste profile and character since the family distillery was established in 1791. We are excited to introduce this new look to the world and inspire a new generation with the unique history and personality of Powers.”

 

2019 Irish Whiskey Awards

The Irish whiskey industry celebrated the 2019 Irish Whiskey Awards a few weeks ago.

Historic producers, emerging producers, and bars were honoured and celebrated October 17th at the Dingle Distillery, County Kerry. The keynote speaker was Colum Egan, Master Distiller for Bushmills Distillery, previous chairman of the Irish Whiskey Association.

According to the Irish Whiskey Association, there are 25 whiskey distilleries in operation in Ireland, the largest number of Irish whiskey distilleries since the late 19th century. Yearly shipments are now over 20 million cases.

The biggest winner, taking the overall prize for Best Irish Whiskey of the Year, was The Irishman 17-year-old. Though The Irishman offers a number of expressions, the 17-year-old ages the longest; a single malt that spends 17 years in a single Sherry cask. This whiskey also claimed the top prize for the Best Irish Single Cask Whiskey.

Other winners include Jameson for the Best Irish Blended Whiskey Under $66 for its Jameson Black Barrel, and the Best Irish Blended Whiskey Over $66 for its Jameson 18-Year-Old Bow Street.

Awards were handed out in 19 categories, which included one winner and two gold medal runners up in each category.  The event also named the best Irish whiskey bars for all four Irish provinces.

The winner for Best Irish Whiskey Bar of the Year (International) is a name any American fan of Irish whiskey is sure to recognize New York City’s The Dead Rabbit.

Here is the complete list of winners on the Irish Whiskey Awards website:
https://www.irishwhiskeyawards.com/news/82-2017-winners-of-the-irish-whiskey-awards.html