The Ultimate Guide to Champagne is now available at La Cité du Vin’s “Reading Room” as a Champagne Reference

I’m honoured to announce that my book “The Ultimate Guide to Champagne” is now available at La Cité du Vin’s “Reading Room” reference library under the category of “Champagne Books”.

La Cité du Vin’s “Reading Room” is an area open to everyone, offering a wide selection of literary, historic, artistic and anthropological works relating to the world of wine. Here you will discover more than 1,200 key works in 16 different languages for reference use.

La Cité du Vin is a unique cultural venue in Bordeaux, France, devoted to wine as a cultural, universal and living heritage. It offers amazing experiences around the world, throughout the ages, and across countless cultures and civilizations. You can book tickets on their website www.laciteduvin.com and onsite.

About “The Ultimate Guide to Champagne
The Ultimate Guide to Champagne takes you through, chapter by chapter, to find out everything you need to know about the wonderful world of Champagne. With original photography, illustrations, charts, maps and a Champagne Tasting Cheat Sheet — this is an essential book for Champagne lovers.

The book consists of 22 chapters covering everything from the region’s history and viticulture, to tourism information, gastronomy and even health benefits.

The book is recommended for everyone, from beginners to experts. It’s a remarkable point of reference into which any wine-lover or professional can dip in and browse.

The book is available on Amazon.com https://www.amazon.com/Ultimate-Guide-Champagne-Liz-Palmer/dp/0991894634 and private events.

Japan Overtakes Germany in Champagne Export Market

Japan has overtaken Germany in export volumes of champagne for the first time in history, according to recent data provided by Comité Champagne.

Japan imported 12.8m bottles between 2016-17, which is a 21.3% increase on the previous year, leapfrogging them above Germany into third place.

“Over the past 20 years, Japan has produced 3,000 sommeliers and the country has a real passion for champagne,” said Vincent Perrin, deputy direct general, Comité Champagne.

“Japan has a strong distribution network and benefited from the free trade agreement announced with the EU.”

The US remains the number one for exports in terms of value, with more than half a billion Euros recorded in 2017, however the UK imported almost 28m bottles over the same period, a global high despite recording an 11% decrease in volumes.

Perrin adds: “There is an uncertainty with the UK due to the effects of Brexit, however the French economy is in a good place so we’re expecting big things for 2018, specifically in the on-trade.”

China grew 76.7% in terms of volume in 2017, the largest increase globally and the country is now ranked 15th in the world.

“These are promising signs from China, but I think they need educating on wines that aren’t Bordeaux reds before they become truly influential,” said Perrin.

Champagne shipments for 2017

The final figures for Champagne shipments in 2017 were recently announced.

Total sales amounted to 307.3 million bottles, which is + 0.4% compared to 2016.

The French market dropped by 2.5% with 153.7 million bottles. “A decline stronger than expected due to disappointing sales in December,” commented Maxime Toubart, president of the Syndicat Général des Vignerons, co-president of the Comité Champagne.

The export, up 3.5%, nearly equals France with 153.6 million bottles. The growth drivers are confirmed outside the European Union (- 1.3% with 76.6 million bottles), since other countries now exceed EU, increasing by nearly 9% to reach 77 million of bottles.

Jean-Marie Barillère, president of the Union des Maisons de Champagne, co-president of the Comité Champagne, is pleased that “thanks to the export and the valuation of its cuvées, Champagne achieves the record turnover of 4.9 billion Euros “.

Data by export country will be available in the next few weeks.

 

Liz Palmer’s multi-award winning book “The Ultimate Guide To Champagne

 

 

Champagne Review: Comte de Senneval Champagne

Champagne Review: Comte de Senneval Champagne

Autolytic notes of biscuit and toast, with creamy lemon and apple with hints of tropical fruit on the palate; persistent bubbles.

Alcohol: 12.50%

Grapes: Chardonnay Pinot Meunier Pinot Noir

Score: 89

Excellent price 19 €

Food pairing suggestions 
Pork, rich fish (salmon, tuna ), shellfish, mild and soft cheese

Cognac XO classification to rise to 10 years

 

 

The BNIC (BNIC Bureau National Interprofessionnel du Cognac) has recently announced that the classification for XO Cognac is set to change on April 1, 2018.

What does this mean?

This means that the youngest eau-de-vie included in a blended Cognac labelled XO* must be aged in barrels for at least 10 years, instead of the 6 years previously required.

 

A statement from BNIC recently explained that: “The new measure aims align the regulation and the market reality, and also to extend the quality positioning of XO (XO covering ‘Out of Age’, ‘Extra’, ‘Ancestral’, ‘Gold’ and ‘Imperial’ designations as well).”

The change was first raised back in 2011 and the interim has been to allow brands to adapt to the change, although the BNIC also noted that many were already using 10-year-old eaux-de-vie for their XOs.

If a producer has not sold through its stocks of younger XO, any spirits classified as XO bottled by 31 March (though not yet shipped) that contain spirit of six, seven, eight or nine years will be allowed to be sold until March 31, 2019. Producers wishing to take advantage of this however will have to make a declaration to the BNIC.

The designation of ‘Napoleon’ Cognac will remain unchanged with the minimum required age of the spirit used being six years.