iDealwine, France’s Top Wine Auctioneer for 6 Consecutive Years

The CVV has confirmed, for the sixth year running, that IWA (International Wine Auction, a subsidiary of iDealwine), is the leading wine auctioneer in France (for the sixth consecutive year), now boasting a 42% market share.
iDealwine has held 41 auction sales in 2020 (one auction every 9 days) with over 175,000 bottles auctioned for a total of €23.4 million including tax – meaning over 40% of all wine sold at auction in France (up from 37% in 2019). Auctions aside, iDealwine’s fixed price sales, which include wine sourced directly from partner properties at cellar door prices, have increased by 46% to reach €10m.  In total, iDealwine generated €33 million in sales in 2020 (+15%).

Despite the tumultuous year, the fine wine auctions market has remained comparatively stable, with iDealwine itself widening the gap in terms of market leaders. In France, wine auctions generated €47 million excluding commission (2019: €47m, 2018: €46m), which represents just 4% of the entire art and collectors’ items category. The art and collectors’ items category itself recorded a significant 22.4% drop in sales. IWA (and therefore iDealwine) has risen to rank as the eighth most important auction house in France in the art and collectors’ item category. Of course, much of this movement was accelerated by the pandemic. As a purely digital player in wine auctions, iDealwine was well placed to deal with the unique situation.
Cyrille Jomand, CEO of iDealwine, said: “We are delighted by this announcement. iDealwine recently welcomed new investment from entrepreneurial fund Capital Croissance. With this, we look forward to increasing iDealwine’s footprint not only in the fine wine world, but also in spirits via our new platform Fine Spirits Auction platform, which sees whiskies, cognacs, rums, and other fine spirits go under the hammer in partnership with La Maison du Whisky. iDealwine is also focused on its new bespoke cellar consultation and management service, offered to wine lovers, collectors, and investors.”
iDealwine has been named the number one wine auctioneer in France for the sixth consecutive year by the regulatory body for auctions in the country.
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Petrus 2000 – the first bottle of wine ‘aged in space’ is up for sale

Twelve bottles of Petrus 2000 spent 14 months aboard the International Space Station — and allegedly tastes ‘several years older’ than it is.

This “space wine” left earth November 2019 and was launched into space. The twelve bottles valued at about $6,000 each spent 438 days aboard the International Space Station (ISS), where a team of disciplined astronauts refrained from drinking them. The wine circled Earth many times, subject to the uncertain effects of microgravity and cosmic radiation, before finally returning to land aboard a SpaceX Dragon capsule on Jan. 14, 2021.

In a statement published May 4, Christie’s auction house announced it will sell a single bottle of the space aged Pétrus 2000 through its Private Sales website (a brokerage service that connects private buyers and sellers outside of the auction house – https://www.christies.com/privatesales/index). The bottle is expected to fetch about $1 million.  It comes packaged in a custom trunk that includes a bottle of terrestrial Pétrus 2000.

Proceeds from this sale will help fund future space-wine research by Space Cargo Unlimited, the private company that sent the bottles to the ISS in 2019. The company has five more wine-related experiments in the works, including a study of the effects of microgravity on grapevine shoots and a plan to study the fermentation process in space, according to Live Science sister site Space.com.

Does space wine taste different?

“I found there was a difference in both color and aromatics and also in taste,” panelist and wine writer Jane Anson told CNN.com.

She added that the space wine tasted “a bit more evolved” than the wine that had remained on Earth, as if it had aged an extra two to three years while in space.

Source:  Space.com

 

 

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Liv-ex 1000 shows that interest in wines from Burgundy, Champagne, the Rhône, Italy, and US has grown rapidly and unexpectedly

New categories of wine are entering the secondary wine market for the first time, with trading up by 70% from 2019.

Bordeaux, which once dominated the secondary market, now has a share of trade less than half of what it was a decade ago. But it hasn’t fallen out of favour – rather, its share has shrunk as the overall market has surged and interest in wines from Burgundy, Champagne, the Rhône, Italy and the US has grown rapidly.

“Last year was a positive year for the wine market, with all major Liv-ex indices showing gains,” said Liv-ex Director and Co-Founder, Justin Gibbs.

Liv-ex (the London International Vintners Exchange) is the London-based global marketplace for the wine trade, where fine wine merchants from around the world buy and sell wine. What happens on the exchange is a reliable indicator of the health of the secondary wine market.

And what it shows is that the secondary wine market is not just booming, it’s broadening.

Fast Market Growth

The number of distinct wine brands traded on Liv-ex last year was up 70%, from 996 in 2019 to 1,420. The total number of wines – including different vintages of the same wine brands – was 8,735, up 72% from the 2019’s 6,367.

The surge has continued into 2021, with March 2021 closing on the biggest month of trade in Liv-ex’s 21-year history – 1,250 distinct wine brands were traded, of which 130 were newcomers to the secondary market. More than £80 million ($109 million) of live bids and offers, are currently available on the market.

The Liv-ex 1000 index was established in 2014 to capture this broadening. As with all Liv-ex indices, it reflects the activity of e Liv-ex membership – a pool of over 500 of the world’s leading wine merchants, who between them represent the biggest and deepest pool of liquidity anywhere in the world.

Most importantly, as a trading and data resource, it is completely independent. And it shows stark changes in the fine wine market, as new wines enter the secondary market.

One Index Alone Is Up 87%

The most striking example of the changing dynamics of the market is the Burgundy 150. It has risen 87% over the last five years, the beneficiary of collectors putting their capital into a new category.

The Champagne 50 has risen 58% over the last five years, driven by the brand power and prestige of the grandes marques Champagnes, widely available stock, global distribution and accessible price points.

The Italy 100 has risen 45% over the past five years, as merchants and collectors discover the relative value to be found in the great wines of Piedmont and Tuscany.

The Rest of the World 60 – which includes the top wines of California, as well as Australian, Spanish and Portuguese wines – has risen 31% over five years. US wines, in particular, are attracting attention; in 2019, US wines represented just 2% of trade by value on the market. That shot up to 7% of total trade last year.

What’s Driving the Trading?

As elsewhere in the economy, technological innovations have swept through the wine industry, transforming the behaviour of both wine businesses and buyers. This past year has seen the launch of new wine tech start-ups, digital wine apps, soaring online sales and virtual tastings, ensuring that people are no longer anxious about buying or trading online.

“These innovations in technology have had a significant impact on buying patterns,” said Gibbs. “As more of the wine trade go digital – with many enabling their customers to access the market using our Automation services – we are seeing increasing diversity in what is traded as collectors are put in the driving seat.”

As a result, the wines brought through Liv-ex in 2020 not only came from the more traditional fine wine regions like Bordeaux and Burgundy, but also from China, Hungary, Switzerland, Austria, Germany, Chile, Argentina and more. Prices per bottle also ranged from £4 to £21,000. As the wine world becomes increasingly digital, this broadening trend is likely continue.

The Market Set to Expand Further

Since 2019, US collectors and merchants have been constrained by the US government’s tariffs on the wines of France, including Bordeaux and Burgundy.

“The tariffs have had a singular effect on the fine wine market over the last 18 months, not least for Italy and Champagne whose wines were excluded from the extra 25% levy,” said Gibbs.

But the recent lifting of the tariffs has had a marked effect on activity – leading to a strong kick in demand for wines of all regions.

There are also other reasons to believe the fine wine market will both grow and diversify further.

“The combination of low interest rates and massive fiscal spending suggests that asset inflation will not be confined to equity, commodity and property markets,” said Gibbs. “The fundamentals of fine wine will also be an attractive option to those with cash to spare.”

#livex1000 #livex #finewine #burgundy #champagne #bordeaux #Rhone #USwine #winenews #instawine #winelovers #winecollectors #wineinvestment #digitalmarketing #finewineregions

 

 

 

More Bordeaux Vineyards Converting to Organic

Increasing numbers of vineyards in Bordeaux are switching to organic methods of production, after lagging behind other French winemaking regions.

According to Patrick Vasseur, vice president of the Gironde Chamber of Agriculture, there are up to date figures available, but anecdotal evidence indicates that around 300 vineyards a year are converting to organic.

 

“It’s quite simple, everyone is switching over” winegrower Philippe Carrille told Vitisphere. His 23-hectare Château Poupille in Castillon Côte de Bordeaux has been certified since 2008.   This surge of new converts, “can only be cause for rejoicing”, added Gwénaëlle le Guillou, director of the New Aquitaine organic wine producers’ organisation (SVBNA). She pointed out that until recently, Bordeaux had trailed well behind other regions, with only 11% of vineyards committed to organic, compared to a national average of 14%.

 

“There are currently significant price differences between organic and conventional, but this will not last,” said Phillipe Cazaux, director of the co-operative group Bordeaux Families.  “Well-deserved added value will remain, though, due to the technical commitments and the risk incurred by the supply side. This year the group has 105 hectares certified organic and 551 hectares in the conversion phase. “Initially, small areas entered the process, but then gradually the larger areas followed suit”, said Cazaux, who plans to convert a fifth of acreage to organic within five years, with a longer-term goal of 1,000 hectares by 2027.

 

Éric Hénaux, director of the Tutiac co-operative group, is adopting a more cautious approach and waiting for the current 620 hectares to be converted by 2022 before making any further plans. “We will see how the market stabilizes,” he said. “A lot of organic wines came on-stream, and prices fell. We have to be careful not to produce more volumes than we have the capacity to sell. The objective is not to sell on the spot market, but to focus on bottles and three-year contracts”.

 

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The Union des Grands Crus de Bordeaux announces 10 cities to host “en primeur” tastings [April 26-29]

The Union des Grands Crus de Bordeaux has announced that this year’s en primeur tastings will be held in 10 cities worldwide (which includes Bordeaux) from April 26-29.

The Union des Grands Crus de Bordeaux has said that Bordeaux, New York, San Francisco, London, Paris, Brussels, Zurich, Frankfurt, Shanghai and Hong Kong will be the host cities for this year’s campaign.

As noted on their website, tastings will be held from 26-29 April in Bordeaux, with further tastings held around the world on the following timetable:

26 April: Zurich and Shanghai
26-27 April: Brussels
27 April: Frankfurt and Hong Kong
27-28 April: Paris, London, San Francisco and New York

Dedicated venues in each city will be chosen where professionals will be able to taste the 2020 wines from the UGCB’s 131-member estates, in accordance with local health regulations.

The UGCB’s president, Ronan Laborde, said: “We are incredibly committed to maintaining ties with our clients and ambassadors. Despite the restrictions in place, we will do everything in our power to ensure they can enjoy the Bordeaux 2020 vintage.”

The new dates for this year’s campaign were confirmed earlier in the year but the UGCB at the time remained unsure if it would be able to hold the annual tasting solely in Bordeaux. It mentioned that its fall-back option would be to hold the tasting in cities around the world, building and improving upon the system of sending out samples that it rushed into place last spring.

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