Oregon Welcomes its 23rd AVA “Mount Pisgah, Polk County – Oregon”

Mount Pisgah, Polk County, Oregon, the newest appellation in Oregon and nested American Viticultural Area (AVA) in the Willamette Valley, has received federal recognition as an official AVA. Drawn to reflect distinct soil, topography and climate attributes.

This new AVA becomes the 23rd federally recognized winegrowing region in Oregon and the 11th nested AVA within the Willamette Valley. The new nested AVA was granted approval by the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) on June 3, 2022 ,and takes effect on July 5, 2022.

Located in Polk County, the Mount Pisgah, Polk County, Oregon AVA is characterized by the warmth of the nearby Willamette River, the mild influence of the Van Duzer winds, and the rain shadow of Laurel Mountain to the west. It is the Valley’s second smallest AVA at 584 planted acres but one of its most densely planted. Mount Pisgah was formed 65 million years ago as a sea floor volcano and has since been covered by marine sediment which pushed up out of the ocean. This unique geology allows the grapes to develop a deep complexity in the region’s shallow soils.

Brad Ford, of Illahe Vineyards petitioned the TTB five years ago for the addition of the AVA to the wine country map. Ten vineyards and three wineries join the new Mount Pisgah, Polk County, Oregon AVA.

“Thanks to an excellent group of growers who helped identify the most important aspects of our little mountain, I have no doubt we will continue to work together to build a beautiful destination for people willing to go the extra mile,” said Ford.

“Recognition of Mount Pisgah, Polk County, shows again how we continue to learn about, and appreciate, new areas of viticultural distinction in Oregon. Each one adds its own chapter to Oregon’s story of unique soils, unmatched geology, topography and globally recognized wine quality” said Oregon Wine Board President Tom Danowski. “These federal AVA designations take years to achieve as the standards are rigorous for establishing a region as clearly differentiated.”

“We’re so excited to see Mount Pisgah, Polk County, Oregon AVA recognized in the larger story of the Willamette Valley,” said Morgen McLaughlin, executive director of the Willamette Valley.

Details of Mount Pisgah, Polk County, Oregon AVA

Official date of recognition: June 3, 2022

Final rule is effective: July 5, 2022

Total acreage: 5,530

Planted acreage: 584

Number of wineries: 3

Number of vineyards: 10

Varieties: Pinot noir, Chardonnay, Pinot gris,
Tempranillo and Pinot blanc

Soil: Marine Sedimentary

Wineries

Illahe Vineyards

Open Claim Vineyards

Amelie Robert Estate

Vineyards Include

Illahe Vineyards

Ash Creek Vineyards

Open Claim Vineyards

Erratic Oaks Vineyard

Freedom Hill Vineyard

Croft Vineyards

Fern Creek

Amelie Robert Estate

Mistletoe Vineyards

Cooper Hollow

#ORwine #OregonWine #wine #winetime #winelover #winery #Oregon #WinesofOregon #winesofinstagram #winetasting #oregonwinecountry #TravelOregon #USwine @oregonwineboard

SYMPOSIUM ‘ACT FOR CHANGE’ ENDS ON A COLLABORATIVE NOTE

Organized by Vinexposium June 20 and 21, 2022 at the Cité du Vin, the Symposium ‘Act for Change’ gathered over 35 international experts representing 17 nationalities for a series of discussions focusing on the future of wines and spirits between now and 2030.

The event, which was held as part of Bordeaux Wine Week, ended on an optimistic note after addressing the main issues affecting the wine and spirits industry. These include changing consumer patterns, the consequences of climate change and their impact on the production and distribution of wine and spirits. Each talk addressed these issues and provided practical insight, both for industry members attending and those who joined the livestream on Vinexposium Connect, the group’s digital portal. Nine major themes were explored by industry players who view the future with pragmatism, ambition, and confidence in a world of experimentation and solutions to cope with the many challenges to come. At the close of the symposium, speakers agreed that the future of the wine industry would be collaborative, innovative and technological, where ethical practices, transparency, knowledge sharing and engagement between the large companies and winegrowers would be promoted.

Here are some observations on the panel discussions and talks:

If fine wines are to have a future, it will be close to nature

Questioned about the future of fine wines, Oliver Bernard shared his views about the changes awaiting the industry. Expressing a mix of enthusiasm and realism, the director of Domaine de Chevalier stressed the importance of reacting immediately to environmental issues, whilst reiterating his confidence in consumers and future generations in celebrating fine wines. Solutions he mentioned included the emergence of new grape varieties for appellation wines, support for estates to switch over to organic and biodynamic winegrowing and adapting vineyard management techniques.

New consumer habits and new sensory profiles

Questioned about flavour and aroma profiles in 2030, Cathy Van Zyl MW, deputy editor of Platter’s South African wine guide, stated that the South African market was in the process of transitioning to lighter wines. Whisky consultant Colin Hampden-White responded by sharing insight into changing spirits styles, which are increasingly flavourful in response to consumer expectations. Pierre Mansour, wine purchasing director for The Wine Society, stressed that 65% of consumers prioritise climate issues in their choice of wines. Many consumers are looking primarily for ‘honest wines’, showing authenticity, viewed as pure site-expressiveness. Honest wines now seem to be establishing themselves as an emerging and growing trend among consumers seeking added value. They are also asking for variety of choice, catering to their own personal consumption habits, and are turning increasingly towards wines that are drier, more unrefined in style, yet remain savoury, and also towards those that pin their environmental credentials to the mast. For spirits, the future is all about creativity, diversity, assertive tastes, and local traceability. New consumers want to be surprised, they are looking for originality and unexpected styles, which can stem either from new distillation techniques or from creative recipes with unfamiliar ingredients. Stéphanie Marchand-Marion, a lecturer at Bordeaux University studies the latest changes in flavour trends, from the consumer perspective and in terms of climate change. She concluded that wines could survive tomorrow’s climate challenges, provided a balance in their composition was found. 

Tomorrow’s packaging – where changing consumer patterns, innovation and lower CO2 emissions converge

The challenge for the packaging of the future will be to respond to the divergence between the unquestionable need to reduce the carbon footprint stemming from the manufacturing process and consumer perception of sustainable, environmentally friendly packaging. In the consumer psyche, glass remains a sustainable vessel, whereas the reality is more complex. The results of steps taken to recycle bottles are not significant, providing evidence of the discrepancy between interest shown for ecological issues and a real desire by consumers to change their habits. Lulie Halstaed, Director of Wine Intelligence – IWSR, has noticed this particularly in Australia, where 67% of wine and spirits buyers believe in climate change, but only 21% claim to act responsibly. Rob Malin, the founder of When in Rome, launched the first wine sold in a paper bottle, which emits 6 times less CO2 than a glass bottle. As a reminder, the production of glass accounts for nearly 40% of the industry’s CO2 emissions.

Tomorrow’s packaging will have two roles to play: research work and the move towards more sustainable packaging will need to continue, and bottles must be used as a tool for educating consumers of wine and spirits, which are among the most highly packaged products around.

Digitalization of Wine and Spirits

Cyril Grira, Retail & Omnichannel director at Google France, has seen an acceleration in searches for wines and spirits on the Google search engine, as with ‘organic wines’ that have increased three-fold. He also points to the fact that most consumer searches focus on grape varieties, appellations, and local productions. Yet, lack of consumer knowledge on the topic (80% of searches are generic) and of visibility for small producers are barriers to industry performance. The wine industry would benefit from taking a leaf out of the fashion and beauty industries’ book, where multiple formats are used to innovate and tell stories. At the same time, the online sales outlet must connect better with the physical sales outlet. As regards the metaverse, experts expressed reservations, stressing that wine and spirits are primarily part of real-life experiences.

Winegrowing and climate change: opportunities in the face of adversity
As climate change causes upheavals, techniques and typicities across the wine regions are evolving. During the symposium, it was unanimously agreed that coping with climate change and human resilience in supporting winegrowing would be pivotal to tackling the issue. Varietal diversification, planting grape varieties in suitable locations, rootstock and balanced management were all cited as resources. Viewing the future with optimism and ambition, participants called on the industry to take leadership of climate issues and underscored the significance of a collaborative approach – one of the biggest challenges is to think collectively, as a community, so that existing solutions can be shared more effectively.

Geopolitics, wines and spirits – lessons to be learnt from crises

The war in Ukraine undermines control of global capitalism, with consequences including the risk of entering a recession and the supremacy of the dollar in international trade. A new global geo-economy is in the making. Faced with this changing situation, the ability of wine and spirits businesses to adapt must enable them to grasp new export opportunities, in regions such as Africa for instance, and strengthen their brands and their image. Compliance with local rules and protection of brands and appellations are also drivers of this success. Similarly, the impact of climate change affects the geopolitics of wine and spirits, both in the positions taken by leaders and the viability of a supply chain designed to respond to the ‘just-in-time’ logistics expected by younger generations. As Christophe Navarre, chairman of the board of Vinexposium pointed out, “The impact of climate change on winegrowing will be huge. This is a priority mission for businesses, the choice is no longer ours”.

Agro-ecology and innovation: essential bedfellows

Faced with climate challenges and the need to remain competitive in a constantly changing marketplace, agro-ecology innovations are the future. They already come in a variety of forms, from the open access ‘calculator’ for measuring carbon footprint, use of artificial intelligence for managing farms and optimising aspects such as yields – including solutions provided by Israeli company Trellis – to the introduction of regenerative techniques. Although the latter concept covers a whole galaxy of realities, relevant regulations are rapidly progressing and influencing – sometimes even restricting – winegrowing practices. From high-tech solutions to a return to basics, agro-ecology is reinventing itself at the instigation of stakeholders who aim to make it accessible to the broadest audience.

How e-commerce has upended the relationship with the consumer

Lockdown expedited online buying and revolutionised sales. Fabrice Bernard, president of Millesima, commented on how the internet piqued consumer interest about wines that they usually did not drink. E-commerce has changed buying habits, but without driving customers away from shops. This development is compelling e-commerce players to rethink the way they work by creating new technology tools such as those provided by Preferabli, which uses digital technology to help consumers make choices. “We will witness consolidation in the marketplace, but the biggest change over the next ten years will be the increasing number of businesses focusing on the customer rather than on the product. Shops are not the only place where customers can have physical interactions. Digital technology will allow the magic surrounding the product’s story to be developed faster and technology can help tell these stories”, claimed Pam Dillon, co-founder and CEO of Preferabli. The future of e-commerce seems to mesh with a competitive marketplace where customer service will make all the difference.

The future of wine and spirits in 2030 – wrapping up 

The near future will require adjustments to cope with current changes, yet also continued pragmatism, concluded Christophe Navarre, chairman of the board of Vinexposium, who stressed the positive pressure from young people for immediate action in favour of the climate. “Rolling out large-scale, practical actions involves reconciling political agendas, corporate activities, and consumer patterns. This is a complex process. For example, in supermarkets, producers who take positive action are not promoted enough. There is no doubt that this is now one of our missions”, he also pointed out in his concluding remarks at the Symposium ‘Act for Change’.

#actforchange #bordeaux #thesymposium #sustainability #winetrends #winenews #winetrade #vinexposium #CitéduVin #wine #winelovers #winetech #wineconference #wineindustry #wineeducation #wineconsumers #winemarketing #bordeauxwineweek @laciteduvin @vinexposium

North America’s Best 50 Bars list launches this summer

The World’s 50 Best Bars, sponsored by Perrier, will launch its North America list this summer!

The awards will be held in New York City June 7, 2022. Mark Sansom, content editor for 50 Best, is confident that the new list will become a key part of the global bar industry.

“The bar scene and extensive talent across this region set the tone for the rest of the world, and we are confident that this new list will be a vital addition to the international bar landscape as bar-goers plan their next cocktail-led adventures,” said Sansom.

“We are especially delighted to bring our inaugural North America’s 50 Best Bars awards ceremony to the city of New York, a vibrant cocktail heartland that has long established itself as a ubiquitous force in the bar universe, having provided The World’s Best Bar in our global list on three occasions.”

The inaugural North America’s 50 Best Bars awards ceremony and unveiling of the list provides a unique opportunity to unite bartenders, bar owners, cocktail aficionados and drinks media from all over the region at a captivating celebration, shining a light on the best in hospitality, while also promoting the strength and diversity of the region’s bar scene as a whole to a global audience.

The inaugural ranking for North America’s 50 Best Bars will reflect the best bar experiences based on the votes of more than 250 gender-balanced voters, made up of anonymous North American bar industry experts which includes bartenders, bar owners, drinks media and cocktail connoisseurs from USA, Canada, Mexico and the Caribbean.

For more details https://bit.ly/NA50BBLaunch22

#NorthAmericas50BestBars #Worlds50BestBars #50BestBars #AwardsCeremony #BarNews #NewYorkCity #Bar #Cocktails #Cocktail #Bartender #Mixology #perrier @perrier

Interest in low and no alcohol sector surges, reaching a record of $10bn in 2021

The demand for no and low alcohol drinks shows no sign of declining across top global markets last year.

According to IWSR’s latest Drinks Market Analysis report, the sector reached a value of nearly US$10bn in 2021. The study further states that in 2021 the no and low-alcohol beer/cider, wine, spirits, and RTD products grew by more than 6% in volume in 10 key global markets, and now has 3.5% volume share of the industry. The low and no alcohol sector is predicted to grow by a further 5.8% between 2021 – 2025, and by 8.5% in value across the same time frame.

Germany is the largest market for low and no alcohol drinks, followed by Spain, the US, Japan and the UK. “Volume of no and low alcohol products in Germany is more than three times that of the next largest no/low market, Spain. Both Germany and Spain clocked volume increases of about +2% in 2021, while the US grew by +31% and the UK by +17%,” says the report, “Total volume of no/low products in Japan registered a small decline (-1%) last year.”

The report went on to say that while Germany and Spain are the biggest and most mature markets for the sector, the UK and the US are two of the most dynamic and growing at a faster rate. In the US, the category is predicted to grow by 28% in volume between 2021 – 2025, and the UK by 6%.

“While January has become a popular month for people to cut back or abstain from alcohol, interest in no and low alcohol drinks has increasingly become a year-round trend among consumers across the world,” said Emily Neill, COO of IWSR Drinks Market Analysis. “To meet that demand, beverage alcohol companies have invested heavily to introduce a number of innovative new products, and many established mainstream brands have recently crossed over to develop no/low alcohol versions of their popular beer, wines, and spirits.”

The report also noted that the no alcohol sector is taking more market share away from traditional brands than low alcohol. Beer and cider is the largest no/low category (at 75% volume share), with no-alcohol beer projected to drive growth at more than 1% over the study’s 2021-2025 forecast period. Meanwhile, no-alcohol RTDs and no alcohol spirits are both expected to post about 14% CAGR volume growth.

The country with the largest proportion of alcohol abstainers is the US, with 23% of no/low drinkers avoiding alcohol completely, while more than half (58%) of no/low consumers report that they choose to switch between no/low and full-strength alcohol products on the same occasion.

While growth of the no-alcohol segment is outpacing that of low-alcohol across the 10 key markets studied, there remains a strong opportunity for low-alcohol products, particularly as the health and wellness trend gains pace across the globe. “As these brands become more visible and well established and the quality improves, there is a real opportunity for growth in low-alcohol.”

#winelovers #wine #winetasting #redwine #whitewine #rosewine #instawine #winetime #winenews #winestagram #winemarketing #digitalmarketing #vin #vinho #vino #lowalcohol
#nonalcoholic #nonalcoholicdrink #noandlow #nolo

Save the Dates: 2022 Wine Days to Celebrate!

To help you plan for 2022, here is list of some of the biggest wine days out there – in chronological order.

This list is comprised of important national or international wine days, with relevant hashtags, is a great starting point to assist you in planning fun and engaging posts. If I missed any dates, or if there are any new dates to be added, please let me know.

Happy Wine Tasting!

Liz Palmer

February

February 1, 2022 – International Furmint Day – #furmintday
February 16, 2022 – International Syrah Day – #syrahday
February 18, 2022 – Global Drink Wine Day – #drinkwineday
February 26, 2022 – Open That Bottle Night – #openthatbottlenight

March

March 3, 2022 – Mulled Wine Day – #mulledwineday
March 13, 2022 – International Riesling Day – #rieslingday

April

April 14, 2022 – Tannat Day – #tannatday
April 17, 2022 – World Malbec Day – #malbecday
April 23, 2022 – International Cava Day – #cavaday
April 27, 2022 – World Marselan Day – #worldmarselanday
April 29, 2022 – International Viognier Day – #internationalviognierday

May

May 6, 2022 – International Sauvignon Blanc Day – #sauvignonblancday
May 9, 2022 – World Moscato Day – #worldmoscatoday
May 17, 2022 – Pinot Grigio Day – #pinotgrigioday
May 25, 2022 – National Wine Day – #nationalwineday
May 26, 2022 – International Chardonnay Day – #internationalchardonnayday

June

June 10, 2022 – World Verdejo Day – #worldverdejoday
June 11, 2022 – National Rosé Day – #nationalroseday
June 18, 2022 – Drink Chenin Blanc Day – #drinkcheninblancday
June 20, 2022 – International Chenin Blanc Day -#internationaldrinkcheninblancday
June 21, 2022 – World Lambrusco Day – #worldlambruscoday

July

July 22, 2022 – Shiraz Day #shirazday
July 25, 2022 – National Wine & Cheese Day – #wine&cheeseday

August

August 1, 2022 – International Albarino Day – #albarinoday
August 4, 2022 – National White Wine Day – #nationalwhitewineday
August 13, 2022 – International Prosecco Day – #proseccoday
August 18, 2022 – International Pinot Noir Day – #pinotnoirday
August 28, 2022 – National Red Wine Day – #redwineday
August 30, 2022 – International Cabernet Day – #cabernetday

September

September 1, 2022 – International Cap Classique Day – #capclassiqueday
September 1, 2022 – International Cabernet Day – #cabernetsauvignonday

September 2, 2022 – National Chianti Day – #chiantiday
September 10, 2022 – International Port Wine Day – #internationalportday
September 16, 2022 – International Grenache Day #grenacheday

October

October 5, 2022 – World Vranec Day – #worldvranecday
October 6, 2022 – National Orange Wine Day – #nationalorangewineday
October 8, 2022 – International Pinotage Day – #pinotageday
October 14, 2022 – Prokupac Day – #prokupacday
October 26, 2022 – International Mavrud Day – #mavrudday
October 27, 2022 – International Carignan Day – #carignanday
October 28 – World Champagne Day – #champagneday

November

November 1, 2022 – International Xinomavro Day – #internationalxinomavroday
November 7, 2022 – International Merlot Day – #internationalmerlotday
November 10, 2022 – International Tempranillo Day -#internationaltempranilloday
November 12, 2022 – Wine Tourism Day – #winetourismday
November 16, 2022 – National Zinfandel Day – #zinfandelday
November 17, 2022 – Beaujolais Nouveau Day – #beaujolaisnouveauday
November 24, 2022 – International Carmenere Day – #carménèreday

December

December 1, 2022 – International Maratheftiko Day – #maratheftikoday
December 4, 2022 – International Cabernet Franc Day – #cabernetfrancday
December 10, 2022 – World Aszú Day – #worldazsuday
December 16, 2022 – Pinot Meunier Day – #meunierday

#winedays #2022winedays #winecalendar #winelovers
#wine #winetasting #redwine #whitewine #rosewine #instawine #winetime
#winenews #internationalwineday #nationalwineday #cheers #winestagram
#winetourism #winemarketing #digitalmarketing #vin #vinho #vino