MOËT LAUNCHES ONE-HOUR CHAMPAGNE DELIVERY IN LONDON UK

Unknown-5Moët & Chandon has launched its one-hour delivery service of its “on the rocks” Ice Imperial Champagne in London only – sorry guys and gals!

Londoners can now have a chilled bottle of Moët Ice Impérial or Moët Ice Impérial Rosé delivered to their doorstep within the hour accompanied by two glasses filled with ice.

Intended to “ignite spontaneous celebration this summer”,  you can book the service online choosing the hour and day.

The first rosé Champagne produced with the intention of being served over ice, Moët & Chandon’s Ice Impérial Rosé NV was launched earlier this year to partner with its Ice Impérial Blanc NV, launched in few years ago.

The service costs £80 for a bottle of Moët Ice Impérial and two acrylic white glasses with ice, or £85 for a bottle of Moët Ice Impérial Rosé.

The service is available in select London postcodes (E1, E14, SE1, W1, SW1, WC2, WC1, EC1, EC2, EC3, EC4) from 12pm to 8pm Sunday to Monday, until 1 September.

visit: uk.moet.com

 

 

 

COMITÉ CHAMPAGNE CANCELS LONDON TASTING

5f91de7d-0df7-4c5c-b594-5b1d64f773fe_three_eightyThe Comité Champagne announced this past week that it won’t be holding its Annual Champagne Tasting in London 2017 after over 20 years staging the event.

Françoise Peretti, who heads up the Champagne Bureau in London, wrote, “The Comité Champagne has been reviewing the annual tastings around the world and it was decided to pause the activity in the UK for the time being.”

“The event, which has been running since 1994, has been very successful, but we feel it is time to review it. Should the Comité Champagne decide to maintain the event, it is unlikely that it would take place before 2018.”

She told Drinks Business that the decision to end the Annual Champagne Tasting was “not a question of slashed budgets; not a question of the UK becoming less important, and not a question of Brexit,” but a result of “a change” in the way the Comité was approaching the marketing of Champagne after more than 20 years hosting the event in London.

Adding “After 20 years, it is time to explore other opportunities.”… “We feel that it is time to look at how we can reinvent the tasting… why do the same thing over and over again?”

While she said that it was “most unlikely” there would be a tasting next year, she said, “be assured, there will be activities”.

Looking ahead, she said that the Champagne Bureau would be spending the second half of this year “canvassing agents, the media, the trade and educators” before deciding how best to promote Champagne in the UK.

Concluding, she said, “I like to see it evolving and everything is possible, we are looking at a big event, or other smaller events, and something digital.”

Nevertheless, she stressed, whatever the approach, “education is number one on the Comité Champagne list”.

The Comité Champagne, formerly known as the CIVC (which stands for Comité Interprofessionnel du Vin de Champagne), is a trade association representing Champagne’s producers and houses. It is tasked with promoting the region’s wines through R&D, as well as marketing and protecting the Champagne appellation.

The generic body was established in 1941 and has held a tasting in London since 1994, which, for the past two years, was held at One Great George Street.

SOURCES:

Champagne Bureau UK

Drinks Business UK

NOVAK DJOKOVIC BUYS LAND IN SERBIA TO START VINEYARD

 

Unknown-3Local sources have claimed that international tennis star Novak Djokovic purchased some land months ago that was negotiated by his uncle, Goran Djokovic.

Djokovic’s land is located near the village of Šumadija in the heart of Servia’s prime wine region, Šumadija, and according to Vladimir Stojić, director of Media Sector, who represent the Šumadija Winemakers Association, the land will require a period of regeneration as it was listed as a vineyard over 50 years ago, but is currently an abandoned woodland.

“It is now being prepared for the grapevines, with planting taking place likely next spring,”Stojić said. “It is not sure when the winery will be built, but it could be in 2017 or 2018.”

Though no official price tag has been disclosed, it is said that just one hectare of land in the Oplenac region can run anywhere between €4,500 and €8,000 (£3,700 to £6,600).

 

Source:  Drinks Business

 The U.S. Becomes Champagne’s Top Export Market

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA - DECEMBER 29: Bottles of champagne are seen on display at a Costco store December 29, 2008 in South San Francisco, California. As the economy continues to falter, sales of sparkling wine and champagne are down this year compared to a 4 percent surge from last year. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

The Champagne category is bubbling over in the U.S. market, driven by a dynamic premiumization trend. With per-case value up 20% to over €300 ($334) last year, the U.S. overtook the U.K. as Champagne’s top export market by value in 2015. Champagne shipments to the U.S. leapt 28% to €515 million ($573m) for the year, surpassing the U.K.’s total of €512 million ($570m), which itself represented a 7% bump. U.S. depletions, at 1.4 million cases last year, remain shy of their 2007 total of 1.6 million cases, but shipment value has surged by nearly 60% since 2010, according to Impact Databank. A slide in the euro—whose value against the dollar is down by about 20% over the past two years—has helped to stoke growth.

From 2010-2014, Champagne’s value on a per-case basis rose a respectable 10% in the U.S., adding around $25. But in 2015 alone, it more than doubled that incremental growth, tacking on about $55 in value to the average case of Champagne. Price hikes and a stronger emphasis on higher-end bubblies are both contributing to the dramatic rise in value.

Piper-Heidsieck, which transitioned from the Rémy Cointreau USA portfolio to Terlato Wines last July, is employing both of those tactics. Piper is extending with a Rare Rosé this year, which will be priced at a premium to prestige cuvée Rare Brut, becoming the brand’s highest-priced offering. While looking to increase its high-end sales, Piper has also taken price hikes on its core Brut non-vintage. “Previously you’d sometimes see the Brut as low as $29.99 on the shelf. Over the holidays last year the average was above $39.99, which is a nice move in the right direction,” says Terlato CEO Bill Terlato.

The third-largest Champagne in the U.S. market, Pernod Ricard’s Perrier-Jouët, is seeing strong results for its prestige cuvée Belle Epoque, which sells above $150 a bottle. “The on-premise is back on a healthy trend and it’s a key driver for our portfolio,” says Aygline Pechdo, brand director for Champagnes at Pernod Ricard USA.

Meanwhile, market leader Moët Hennessy USA continues to enjoy impressive progress with the dynamic duo of Veuve Clicquot and Moët & Chandon, which dominate the category with a combined 60% share. Portfoliomate Dom Perignon is also among the top five Champagnes in the U.S. in volume terms—totaling nearly 60,000 cases annually—despite a retail price above $160 a bottle.

Fourth-ranked player Nicolas Feuillatte tells SND it’s focused on expanding Champagne into new consumption occasions. “We’ll be launching new advertising and social media campaigns this year which support our vision for the future of Champagne as more modern and accessible,” says Feuillatte’s Americas export manager Olivier Zorel. —Daniel Marsteller

U.S. – Top Six Champagne Brands
(thousands of nine-liter cases)
Depletions Percent Change3
Rank Brand Importer 2013 2014 2015 2013-2014 2014-2015
1 Veuve Clicquot Moet Hennessy USA (LVMH) 383 415 453 8.3% 9.3%
2 Moet & Chandon1 Moet Hennessy USA (LVMH) 354 369 382 4.1% 3.6%
3 Perrier-Jouet Pernod Ricard USA 71 71 80 -0.3% 11.8%
4 Nicolas Feuillatte Ste. Michelle Wine Estates 67 68 68 1.5% 0.0%
5 Dom Perignon Moet Hennessy USA (LVMH) 56 59 58 5.2% -1.7%
6 Piper Heidsieck Terlato Wines International 51 45 42 -11.4% -7.0%
Total Top Six2 983 1,027 1,083 4.5% 5.4%
1 excludes Dom Perignon
2 addition of columns may not agree due to rounding
3 based on unrounded dataSource: IMPACT DATABANK

Source: Shanken News

 

Liz Palmer

liz-palmer.com

@Champagnehouses

@LizPalmer_

Interview with: Elizabeth Grant-Douglas, Director of Winemaking at La Crema Winery – Sonoma, California [Women in Wine Business]

elizabeth-grant-douglasThis week, I spotlight Elizabeth Grant-Douglas, Director of Winemaking at La Crema Winery – Sonoma, California.

About La Crema Winery

La Crema was founded in 1979 as La Crema Viñera or “Best of the Vine.”

It’s a Jackson Family winery and is located outside of Santa Rosa, Sonoma County, California. For over 35 years, the family-owned winery focused exclusively on cool-climate coastal appellations. La Crema is currently leading the way on sustainable agriculture, with early certification as a sustainable winegrower, and being named and recognized as “The Green Company of the Year” by the beverage industry.

About Elizabeth Grant-Douglas

Elizabeth’s interest in winemaking grew out of an early passion when she gained her initial experience alongside her parents, who were hobby winemakers, in the basement of their Niagara Falls home.

Now Director of Winemaking at La Crema, Elizabeth’s unique training in cool-climate oenology has given her the patience and practice required to produce award-winning Chardonnay, Pinot Gris and Pinot Noir varietals.

Initially studying Economics at the University of Waterloo, Elizabeth shifted her career studies to Brock University’s Cool Climate Oenology and Viticulture program.

“Brock had just announced  the program I was finishing my Economics degree”

“I couldn’t think of anything I’d rather do—I still can’t!”

Liz Palmer: 
You joined La Crema as an enologist in 2001, became Winemaker in 2010, and promoted to Director of Winemaking in 2013 – what have the highlights been during your tenure?

Elizabeth Grant-Douglas:
Watching the evolution of the brand from 2010 to now, and adding new vineyards in Oregon. The wines have also become more interesting and more complex – very exciting! I’ve been with La Crema for fifteen years and it never gets dull.

Liz Palmer:  
How closely do you work with the vineyard manager and team?

Elizabeth Grant-Douglas:
I manage five teams with a total of eight.  I work with the teams from pruning to harvest by checking the quality of the grapes and tasting the blends – they all provide me with their feedback.

Liz Palmer:
La Crema Winery has integrated some environmentally-sustainable practices. Can you tell me about this?

Elizabeth Grant-Douglas:
We are very dedicated to sustainability. This is a family business and we look what is best for next generation, in the long term.  We try to be as sustainable as possible in every phase of production—not only in the vineyard, but in the winery. We have analyzed all our procedures, and we’re working to be 100 percent sustainable.

Liz Palmer: 
Are you finding any challenges related to climate change and global warming?

Elizabeth Grant-Douglas:
We are looking at this.  There is no consistency – early rain – rain during bloom – there is no pattern.

Liz Palmer: 
What are your winemaking goals in the next year or two?

Elizabeth Grant-Douglas:
This year we are looking to reveal our first “sparkling wine” from Oregon – I’m really excited about this! It will be brut and I’m really looking forward to it.

Liz Palmer:
I’d like to ask you about the evolving role of women in the wine world. Historically, women have encountered resistance and prejudice when they enter the wine industry?

I’ve had no issues – my generation have been very fortunate as the trail blazers have paved the way.

I work with a lot of other female winemakers – we work well together.

Liz Palmer:
Which other female leaders do you admire and why?

Elizabeth Grant-Douglas:
Barbara Banke, the Chairman & Proprietor of Jackson Family Wines – she supports sustainability and has created a company for families.

Liz Palmer:
How do you maintain a work/life balance?

Elizabeth Grant-Douglas:
During the harvest – I make sure I have family dinners with my son and and husband. I take my son with me on weekends into the vineyards – he actually likes grapes!

Liz Palmer:
What is your advice for other young women entrepreneurs?

Elizabeth Grant-Douglas:
Travel as much as possible earlier on in your career.  Be fearless – look to find something that excites you!

www.LaCrema.com