Private Clients and Investors invited to bid at Hospices de Nuits-Saint-Georges Wine Auction on March 14, 2021

This year, for the first time, Burgundian producer Maison Edouard Delaunay is allowing a limited number of private clients and investors the chance to bid at this spring’s 60th Hospices de Nuits Wine Auction which will be held March 14th, 2021.

Since 1961, this “en primeur” sale of 228-litre barrels has been solely for trade buyers, until this year, the négociant will allow a number of private collectors to bid for the first time.

Prospective buyers can purchase a minimum of 24 bottles. They will be welcome (Covid restrictions dependent) to stay at Château de Gilly on Friday, March 12, with a visit to the Maison Delaunay winery on Saturday and then attend a tasting and lunch at the Hospices de Nuits on the day of the auction, Sunday, March 14, 2021.

The wines sold will finish their aging in the cellars of Maison Edouard Delaunay, at Étang Vergy, under the supervision of cellar master Christophe Briotet, recently nominated “best winemaker in the world” by the “International Wine Challenge”.

A Historical Relationship
The historic relationship between Maison Edouard Delaunay and the Hospices de Nuits began long before the first auction in 1961, when Laurent Delaunay’s grandfather bought Hospices de Nuits wines by mutual, exclusive agreement.

The Charity – Hospices de Nuits
Hospices de Nuits consists of a working hospital, a retirement home and one of the most beautiful collections of vineyards of Nuits-Saint-Georges and the Côte de Nuits whose wines are sold at the traditional March auction.

The Hospices de Nuits was founded in 1270 and is historically older than Hospices de Beaune which was founded in 1443. The Hospices de Nuits began offering its wine at auction 60 years ago. Over the centuries the Hospice has been bequeathed numerous vineyards which today comprises of 12.5 hectares. Most of the vineyards are in Nuits-Saint-Georges, covering six parcels of village appellations and nine premier crus, and including Les Didiers.

Laurent Delaunay states: “To bid at the Hospices de Nuits combines the pleasure of buying top wines with the joy of contributing to a great charity.”

For further information, and details of how to sign up and bid https://burgundyauction.wine/

Save the Dates: 2021 International Wine Days to Celebrate!

To help you plan for 2021, I created a list that you can bookmark. The list, which isn’t exhaustive, is comprised of important national or global wine days (dates may be subject to change) with relevant hashtags. This is a great starting point to assist you in planning fun and engaging posts on social platforms. If I missed any or if there are any new dates for 2021, please let me know. Cheers!

January

Dry January

February

February 1, 2021 – National Furmint Day [#furmintday]

February 16, 2021 – Syrah Day [#syrahday]

February 18, 2021 – Global Drink Wine Day [#globaldrinkwineday]

February 27, 2021 – Open That Bottle Night [#openthatbottlenight]

March

March 3, 2021 – Mulled Wine Day [#mulledwineday]

March 13, 2021 – Riesling Day [#rieslingday]

April

April 14, 2021 – Tannat Day [#internationaltannatday]

April 17, 2021 – Malbec World Day [#worldmalbecday]

April 23, 2021 – International Cava Day [#cavaday]

April 27, 2021 – Marselan Day [#worldmarselanday]

May

May 7, 2021 – International Sauvignon Blanc Day [#sauvblancday]

May 9, 2021 – World Moscato Day [#worldmoscatoday]

May 25, 2021 – National Wine Day [#NationalWineDay]

May 27, 2021 – International Chardonnay Day [#internationalchardonnayday]

June

June 5, 2021 – National Bubbly Day [#nationalbubblyday]

June 19, 2021 – Drink Chenin Blanc Day [#drinkcheninblancday]

June 21, 2021 – World Lambrusco Day [#lambruscoday]

June 25, 2021 – International Rosé Day [#roseday]

July

July 22, 2021 – Shiraz Day [#shirazday]

July 25, 2021 – National Wine & Cheese Day [#NationalWineandCheeseDay]

August

August 1, 2021 –World Albariño Day [#worldalbarinoday]

August 4, 2021 – National White Wine Day [#nationalwhitewineday]

August 13, 2021 – International Prosecco Day [#proseccoday]

August 18, 2021 – International Pinot Noir Day [#pinotnoirday]

August 28, 2021 – National Red Wine Day [#nationalredwineday]

August 30, 2021 – International Cabernet Sauvignon Day [#cabernetsauvignonday]

September

September 2, 2021 – International Cabernet Day [#CabernetDay]

September 3, 2021 – National Chianti Day [#NationalChiantiDay]

September 17, 2021 – International Grenache Day [#GrenacheDay] 

October

October 5, 2021 – World Vranec Day [#worldvranecday]

October 6, 2021 – Orange Wine Day [#orangewineday]

October 9, 2021 – International Pinotage Day [#pinotageday]

October 15, 2021 – Champagne Day [#champagneday]

October 28, 2021 – Carignan Day [#carignanday]

November

November 1, 2021 – International Xinomavro Day [#xinomavroday]

November 7, 2021 – International Merlot Day [#merlotday]

November 11, 2021 – International Tempranillo Day [#tempranilloday]

November 17, 2021 – National Zinfandel Day [#zinfandelday]

November 18, 2021 – Beaujolais Nouveau Day [#beaujolaisnouveauday]

November 24, 2021 – Carmenère Day [#carmenereday]

December

December 4, 2021 – Cabernet Franc Day [#cabfrancday]

December 10, 2021 – World Aszú Day [#aszúday]

December 20, 2021 – Sangria Day [#SangriaDay]

Seven Oregon Pinot Noirs Make Wine Spectator’s Top 100 List

Wine Spectator’s Annual Report names 100 of the best, most interesting wines in the world, with seven made in Oregon

Around this time every year since 1988, Wine Spectator gathers the best of the best wines its editors have tasted throughout the year, bestowing their favorite, most excellent wines made in or imported into the U.S. with a spot on the highly coveted “Top 100 list.” Oregon wines are often overrepresented on this prestigious list, garnering around five or six spots annually, or 5 or 6%, which is no small feat considering that Oregon accounts for far less than 1% of global wine production.

But in 2020, the number of Oregon wines set a new record in Wine Spectator’s Top 100 list with seven Oregon Pinot noirs earning their way on to this list. Put another way, this means 7% of the most exciting wines in the entire world are made in Oregon.

How hard is it to get onto Wine Spectator’s Top 100 list?
The magazine receives about 11,000 wines each year for evaluation, so the odds of getting on this list are more than 100 to 1.

According to Wine Spectator, “Our selection prioritizes quality (based on score), value (based on price) and availability (based on the number of cases either made or imported into the United States). These criteria are applied to the wines that rated outstanding (90 points or higher on Wine Spectator’s 100-point scale) each year to determine our Top 100…These wines are a diverse group—ranging from emerging labels and regions to traditional estates exploring new directions—and all generate the excitement we call the “X-factor.”

Winners this year include a top ten entry, Beaux Freres Pinot Noir Ribbon Ridge The Beaux Frères Vineyard 2018 with a score of 95, (the Beaux Frères Vineyard pictured above, photo by Carey Critchlow). Senior Editor Tim Fish described this wine as “A wine of presence and expression, impeccably structured yet elegantly layered, with evocative raspberry, rose petal and brown baking spice notes that pick up richness and tension toward fine-grained tannins.”

The other six winners and their respective spots on the list plus ratings are below. According to the magazine, a rating of 95-100 is deemed as a “Classic.” and a wine rated with a 90-94 is “Outstanding.”

#19: Résonance Pinot Noir Willamette Valley 2017, 93

#29: The Four Graces Pinot Noir Dundee Hills Reserve, 2017, 94

#33: Ken Wright Pinot Noir Willamette Valley, 2017, 91

#37: Bergström Pinot Noir Willamette Valley Cumberland Reserve, 2018, 94

#64: La Crema Pinot Noir Willamette Valley 2018, 92

#79: Stoller Pinot Noir Willamette Valley 2018, 90

“Placing a record seven Oregon wines among the world’s Top 100, and five in the top 40, is welcome recognition for Oregon and a reflection of the exceptional fruit and winemaking talent here,” notes Oregon Wine Board President Tom Danowski.

Stoller Family Estate appeared for the first time on this list in 2020, and the designation is not lost on founder and owner Bill Stoller. “Wine Spectator is one of the most influential publications in our industry, and it’s an incredible honor to earn a spot on its Top 100 list,” he said. “Our Vice President of Winemaking, Melissa Burr, has been honing her craft over the last 15 years. She created an everyday Pinot Noir that embodies the spirit and complexity of our region. To have our 2018 Willamette Valley Pinot Noir place alongside some of the best in the world is a testament to Melissa and her team’s dedication.”

Holiday Cocktails: The rise of TikTok Mixologists

An increasing number of mixologists are taking to TikTok to share videos on how to make popular cocktails, add new ones, and entertain while bars remain shut down.

In finding another way to channel their craft, TikTok mixologists are teaching people how to make holiday cocktails, in the safety of their own home!

Some of these videos should come with a “safety warning”, as glasses of alcohol are lit on fire and bottles are tossed into the air by “flair bartenders” showing off their skills.

This new form of drinks mixing is becoming more of a performance than a service, as no drink arrives at your table by the end of the video.

With Christmas on the way and Covid cases on the rise, who wouldn’t want a how-to video on making your own Peppermint Martini in a glass rimmed with crushed candy canes?

Here are some of my favorite TikTok Mixologists:

@theparadise.bartender

Hawaii–based Ashley Hupp, known as @theparadise.bartender, has 2.7 million TikTok followers, She shares popular Tropical Cocktails.

@elitebartendingfl

Kevin Gibbons of the Elite Bartending School in Orlando knows his stuff. His videos are quick and informative showing you how to make lots of mouth-watering concoctions. 306k followers

@sincitybartender

This is Vegas at its best – you are instantly greeted with hundreds of brightly coloured cocktails. Click onto any of them and you’ll be given clear instructions on how to make colourful concoctions. No classics here, just contemporary drinks that you can make at home. 795.5 followers

@spritzandspice

Armeta Sidhu’s cocktail account is packed full of delicious step-by-step recipes. With 88.4k subscribers, Armeta shows you how to make a number of classic drinks.

This is a great resource for those just starting on their cocktail mixing journey.  Tik Tok videos are short, concise and easy to follow and give you the confidence to try new things, or just want to perfect the classics, these accounts should help you mix up some holiday magic!

 

#cocktail #bartending #TikTok #bartenders #flairbartending #flair #drinks #holidaydrinks #christmasdrinks #christmas #tiktok #Sunday #sundayfunday #instagood #gin #vodka #whiskey #bar #mixology

Tequila Bar “400 Rabbits” registers to become a church so it can stay open

As reported by the Nottingham Post (UK), James Aspell has registered for his Tequila bar 400 Rabbits  to become ‘The Church of The Four Hundred Rabbits’. He sent the application request to the registrar general in Nottingham.

Under tier-three restrictions, places of worship are allowed to stay open but those who visit them must only do so with members of their household or support bubble.

In order for his cunning plan to work, Aspell will need members of the public to sign up to his congregation via The Church of Four Hundred Rabbits’ website.

Those interested in attending Aspell’s Tequila church can either become “a bunny believer” or “a reverend of the righteous rabbits”. The finer details of what shape the worshipping within the church will take have yet to be ironed out.

“The intention of this is to be a joke, but it comes from a serious place. With the new restrictions, we’re forced to close and it could be months before we can reopen. We don’t have a food offering, so even if we were in tier two, we couldn’t open,” Aspell told the Nottingham Post.

“We feel like we’ve been targeted unfairly and it seems wrong. Everything from gyms to massage parlors can stay open and even the Christmas markets are happening, so we sent in an application to register as a place of worship.

“This time of year it’s usually all guns blazing but instead I’m sat at home putting my Christmas decorations up. We have no intention of opening unless the application is granted or when restrictions are lifted,” he added.

Aspell, who opened 400 Rabbits in 2015, said that the response to his quirky idea has been “overwhelmingly positive”. He is yet to find out whether his application has been successful.